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Tzulscha

Met the former C.O. of Kampfgruppe "Lindemann"

522 posts in this topic

Bump. Happy birthday to the Major.

I have a question. Does he know if any other members of his KG are still alive, and if so, does he keep in touch with them? Would be neat to find other members of KG Lindemann and have some sort of reunion or something. History in a room like that is very exciting. Thanks for the great read!!

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Well Tzulscha,

ifMr. Lindemann needs something done here in Würzburg, just send me a note, i live in Würzburg and would be glad to help him.

HTMD where are you from?

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i know thurnau very well, was born near Hof in Oberkotzau, life in Würzburg now but worked from 1996 to 1998 in Bayreuth, lifed there in Creußen.........

Funny small earth, this weekend i will be in Trebgast to visit some friends :D

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Hey guys!

Yeah, Lindemann is from Wurzburg.

He had planned to go back this fall, but (minor) back surgery has delayed him 'til probably this spring.

While he lost a lot in the bombings, I guess he still has family and friends there. He said he was trying to find any of his old photos and whatever else he can dredge up.

Uedel, if you and HTMD want to pm me with some contact info, I will see that he gets it.

I will be talking to Lindemann tommorrow (mostly to tell him that I'm still not finished with his tank model.) :(

Should have some more pics and stuff up pretty soon.....

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Here's what I'm taking for the Major to see tomorrow. It looks pretty much finished.... until you look inside the turret....

10101457oe.jpg

I wanted the Tiger to look pretty new yet although it will be obvious it's been around a bit. Still some more weathering to do.

10101473nm.jpg

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Still got tools to stow, soot for exhausts, dust streaking, paint chipping, grease smears, grubby handprints and rust.... and he wonders why it ain't done yet...

10101495qt.jpg

I kinda like the way the paint burned on the exhaust shields. Needs soot tho.

10101528ae.jpg

I know I got some things wrong here, like incorrect exhaust shields and a few other things I'm not gonna mention and hope people don't notice. Ya gotta stop somewhere!

I will spend some time asking questions for you guys tomorrow!

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Mr. Lindemann stopped by the shop this afternoon, unfortunately in the midst of a swarm of customers. By being slightly rude to other customers, I managed to display and demonstrate how the model came apart, confirm markings and determine that he was very pleased with it's accuracy and level of detail. A bit impatient at the amount of time I'm taking to finish this thing, but satisfied with the result so far. He took the diorama with him to show to some other people and will bring it back next week for me to finish. While I had time I also wished him a Happy Birthday from WWIIOL guys all around the world. He said to thank you all, I think he is a bit flattered by the attention.

This thing is really getting pretty hefty, with the metal tracks on and all those solid chunks of resin inside it, the model is actually approaching 1lb. I hope the suspension holds out!

Ok, todays answers are, in no particular order;

Aismov, when I asked him how tankers kept cool he basically laughed. "We are sitting in an iron box, in the desert, with an enormous motor behind us making more heat. The only place we had ever seen airconditioning was at the cinema."

He said that whenever he got a chance he would volunteer to take the northern flank of a movement, as that put his unit closest to the Med coast where conditions were a bit more comfortable.

Night time was less of a problem obviously, as temperatures tend to dip rather precipitously in the desert after dark.

I asked about water and mentioned that the British 8th army got a ration of one gallon per, day per man, for all purposes. His reply was that the Tommies had it easy, DAK got one Liter per man, per day, for all purposes. If you wanted a wash or shave you'd better hope you were close to the coast. Oh, and you don't spit when you brush your teeth. :o

Initially at least, water was carried in jerry cans on trucks back and forth between supplies and units. Later tanker trucks were used as you could haul more water that way and a unit would refill the cans they had.

Food was always a problem too. Rations tended to be canned sausage and potatoes, canned beans, canned fish, a bread ration as often as the bakers could manage and whatever they could scrounge. Unless they were in the deep desert, arabs alway turned up to sell the troops anything they could. Lindemann said they would just wander in through the German perimeters and suddenly there would be a bunch of them setting up a bazaar. Some of the foods were a bit suspect however. One of his crew came up to him one day and asked if he thought that a carcass being sold would be edible. Inspecting it closely, Lindemann turned back to the guy and told him "We don't eat dog meat." Still, desparate times...

Mcdeath and a couple others asked about awards;

Lindemann was allowed to pick his personal crew, all were at least OberFeldWebel and everyone had at least Eisenkreuz First or Second Class. Lindemann himself was up for a Ritterkreuz near the end but his commander kept putting it off. "There will be time later." he said. If I understand correctly, you needed both First and Second Class Iron Cross to be eligible for the Knights Cross. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) for him, his war ended before the paperwork went through...

Werwulf, I'm sure you can imagine how rare a DAK guy is here in the states. Lindemann said that as far as he knew, he was the last survivor of his Kampfgruppe.

If any of you guys out there are aware of any other survivors, most likely in Germany, possibly South America, he would be grateful I am sure, for the information.

Ron, when I asked why he came back to the U.S. he said that he had gotten his engineering degree and was trying to find something that would pay him decently. He and some others had a 'too good to be true' offer in Caracas, and after that fell through he went to the states. The money here for an engineer after the war was pretty darn good and so, he stayed. Among other things he was one of the guys who did design work on the Abrams, and insists that he's the one who made sure it used a steering wheel for turning just like the Tiger.

Hey! I have tomorrow off! And I don't have to work on that bloody model! Woot! Maybe I'll actually have time to play this silly game!

(nah, GF will find something industrious for me to do.... ;) )

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they would just wander in through the German perimeters and suddenly there would be a bunch of them setting up a bazaar.

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Among other things he was one of the guys who did design work on the Abrams' date=' and insists that he's the one who made sure it used a steering wheel for turning just like the Tiger.[/quote']

Very eloquent.

Now just hope he does not bring the model back in 5,000 peices. :P

Did he get to keep his uniform or still have any souvenirs he might have pulled from his tank? Also, any knowledge of his Tiger's fate?

Thx Tzu.

Edit: Sticky This.

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Hello!

I spent all my morning to read this thread! AMAZING!!

It rocks, very interesting, facts and small stories of the "soliders" are really more interessting than all the "crap" we can read in the ww2 books!

Keep us in touch and nice work for the Tiger by the way!

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Thanks Flipflap!

I love positive feedback. :)

Strukt, you asked me before about what POWs got to keep, I did ask but forgot to include it in an earlier post.

Initially at least, prisoners wore their own uniforms if they were still servicable, with a 'P' stencilled on the back. As their gear wore out they were issued US fatigue uniforms also with a stencilled 'P'.

Personal gear like patches, ribbons, decorations, hats, watches, rings, etc. etc. were either confiscated, swapped or sold very quickly. Personal items like family photos, wedding rings and the like could usually be held onto unless you got unlucky.

There is a Bill Mauldin (of Willy & Joe fame) cartoon of a scruffy looking German PW riding the hood of a jeep back to captivity and counting money. "$100 for a Luger, $10 for a helmet, $20 for an Iron cross, real profitable surrendering to the Americans!"

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quick question in regards to the model... are you going to be drawing in kill rings or did he decide not to paint any kill rings on his Tiger?

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If you look REAL close at the barrel in the last shot, you might be able to see it's wearing 25-30 kill rings now.

Not his full tally, but I wanted the tank to appear in pretty good shape which means fairly early in its career.

This is the way it looked just before Kasserine.

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Ah yes, heheh, you are right. Wasn't looking close enough - nice touch!

I have another sort of eh "more difficult" question to ask :D

As you can see on the early model Tigers, they still had a series of pistol ports placed in the turret - these were deleted in the later E versions of the Tiger for reasons of turret armor integrity and because of their general (lack of) usefullness.

My question is if Maj. Lindemann ever had to use said pistol ports (technically SMG ports), or if it was common practice really at all in the Panzerwaffe. Specifically what I am getting at is to know if anybody with half a brain would have either retreated with his tank to get back to protection of friendly infantry and not be mobbed by enemy infantry, thus neciessating use of the pistol port, or if disabled they would have bailed long before some American or British riflemen would come knocking.

Also, what was the typical way to surrender a tank if surrounded by infantry. Did you pop the hatch and wave a white flag? Jump out and hope for the best? Wait inside untill somebody start telling you to get out?

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Also' date=' what was the typical way to surrender a tank if surrounded by infantry. Did you pop the hatch and wave a white flag? Jump out and hope for the best? Wait inside untill somebody start telling you to get out?[/quote']

Good question.

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Hi guys!

Herr Lindemann dropped off the dio, all intact!

"You guys ask some of the strangest questions!" :)

Pistol ports first,

Commander did carry a pistol (Walther p-38) and one port is just behind him to the left. There is a clip for an Mp-38 to his right and also accessable by the loader. The loaders pistol port was replaced in later Tigers by the escape hatch. Late Tigers had a different type and the last ones usually just had them plugged and welded shut.

An interesting note, the loaders seat actually faced backward. It could be folded out of the way for action.

pistolport44jj.jpg

^^^The black, curved object in the lower left corner is part of the commanders seat.

pistolport56aj.gif

As you can see the port was a fairly simple rotating disk plugging a hole in the turret armour. This is the same as should be on the ingame Tiger.

The actual answer to your question though, is No he never used them, at least not as a weapons port, they did use them for ventilation....

Surrendering is a much tougher question. There were no 'rules' for an individual surrender. How could there be? It all has to do with the situation. Lindemanns surrender was by order. They destroyed their weapons and waited for the British and Commonwealth Forces to show up. After they'd been shelled a bit to make sure they weren't going to fight back, "The Tommies came in on foot and we showed that we didn't have weapons and that was that." (Note Lindemann was severely wounded while this was going on and it is a bit fuzzy for him I think).

As far as surrendering a tank, he said it never quite worked that way. "If your tank was on fire or something, you just got out as fast as you could (and they practiced bailing out.), you could take your chances that noone would shoot you, but if the tank was on fire, you KNEW that was going to kill you." Most of the time it would be pretty obvious to the shooter that the shootee had been knocked out, and crew was bailing. A good tanker would be selecting a new target as soon as he saw that his previous target was K.O.'d.

Ultimately, if your infantry is surrounding a helpless, immobile tank, it's pretty much up to them whether your tank crew is even allowed to surrender.

By the way, he said he never saw a DAK tank surrender. Bail out and run like hell, yes, but no waving of white flags. :)

He also claims to have never lost a panzer under his command. (I haven't been able to prove or disprove this yet.)

Oh yeah, Strukt, the only souvenirs he has are PW stuff, and I haven't seen any of it. When last seen, 'his' Tiger was in Texas along with a bunch of other junk being examined by the US Army. Almost certainly it was later turned into scrap metal.

Just out of curiousity, for you real life tankers out there, how much time do you guys spend practicing bailing out?

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Something I just thought of..

I was reading an article somewhere or other that mentioned that later Tigers were equiped with a 'destruction kit' which consisted of two blocks of explosives one to be placed under the engine block and one for the gunbreech. I have also heard another method of ruining the gun was draining the oil out of the recoil compensators and firing the gun. This would smash the breech against the back wall of the turret, possibly even breaking the gun trunnions.

Lindemanns crews poured sand into the fuel tanks and carburettors of their vehicles and let them run. He said that to destroy the gun they just hammered a rock in the muzzle and remote fired an HE round...

When KG Lindemann destroyed their weapons before surrendering they made sure that the same parts were wrecked on each tank so they couldn't be pieced back together.

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