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Tzulscha

Met the former C.O. of Kampfgruppe "Lindemann"

521 posts in this topic

How much time did we spend practicing bailing out of tanks? Not a lot, really, I mean,it's pretty simple. Did do a few rollover drills though

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Well MajorTom!

I am very glad to meet David Byrden! Even more so to find you are a WWIIOL type!

Your references and drawings were absolutely vital to me on this build!

I stumbled onto your website while doing my research. Through the Tiger Fiebel link I think.

I have waved a number of your diagrams at Lindemann to see if they were correct already and he found no faults or errors.

I would be happy to show off your turret stowage diagrams. Since those are what I'm working off I hope he says they are correct! :)

He is only familiar with the early turret and stowage though.

I'll tell ya what, the Major is pretty computer illiterate, but I'll print out the diagrams and send them off with him to sketch on. Then I can scan that and send it back to you.

It helps a lot when I show him pictures, I have found him correcting his own descriptions aftwards.

Something I've noticed about the old vets though. We modern modelers care a lot more about the small fiddly bits than they ever did. I remember asking a B-17 crew what model he flew and he didn't know until I started describing features. Survival was a bit more important I think... :)

Almost all of Lindemanns research is postwar books too. When I asked him for reference material he came up with a lot of things I already had.

I will also ask about the Arabs. To be quite frank, from what he's mentioned about them so far I get the feeling that they were held in some contempt however.

I have one for you MajorTom.

Where did you get the reference for the blue-green interior on your Tiger model? I looked at that for the longest time trying to decide if that's the way I wanted to paint my Tiger model.

I couldn't find any other source that mentions it so eventually I went with the iron oxide primer for everything below the sponsons and the Major seems to agree with that.

I'm not arguing with it, especially since you seem to have spent a lot of time on this project. Just curious.

Oops gotta go to work!

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I can answer tom's question - yes Arabs indeed did fight for Germany in the Desert War. Not in large numbers, but they did fight. Some as volunteers, some as pseudo-mercenaries, the list goes on.

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Von Luck mentioned the Arabs in his book many times. It appeared to me that he thought little of the city dwellers, but had much respect for the Bedouins (Possibly because of their world famous riding skills and his history in the cavelry).

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I have a question that maybe lindemann can answer or someone else.

What kind of situation was his Kampfgruppe in, when they were ordered to surrender. It seems odd to me that they were told to surrender when he had enough time to destroy the tanks then take artiliary fire and then wait for the tommys to show up.

He mentions that he thinks his leader surrendered before he did. Had he the choice would he have widthdrawn or surrendered?

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From earlier talks with Lindemann and some of my own research, I can tell you that 21st panzer divisions last operation as a complete unit in Afrika was an attack on Kasserine on 19 February 1943. After the attack slowed then stalled, the Division broke into independently operating Kampfgruppen for the final confused weeks in Tunisia. According to Lindemann, his gruppe wound up defending the airfield at Cape Bon.

Sometime during these weeks Lindemann was offered the 'opportunity' of flying out of Cape Bon as pilot on an Me-323 'Gigant'. Wisely in my opinion, he chose to remain with his gruppe and his Tiger.

Had he gone with the evacuation flight, he would have been flying an Me-323 through the middle of the 'Cape Bon Massacre', where Spitfires and Tomahawks cut a massive flight of Ju-52's and Me-323s absolutely to ribbons.

The nominal division commanders at the end were Oberst H.G. Hildebrandt who went sick on 25 April, and was replaced by Generalmajor H.G. von Hulsen.

Kampfgruppe Pfieffer, surrendered on the 11th of May, with remaining DAK troops surrendering over the next two days.

KG Lindemann, deployed in an olive grove near the airfield, still had supplies and continued to successfully defend their position, keeping British and Commonwealth troops a respectful distance from their guns until recieving the surrender order on 13 May. The crews rendered their equipment unusable and surrendered to British troops that afternoon.

I think Lindemann feels that von Hulsen lost control of the situation in Tunisia at the end. He thought that the withdrawal and evacuation could have been managed much better, probably saving lives and valuable equipment. He saw von Hulsen as having given up on saving his troops and concentrating on trying to save himself. (This may not actually be fair to von Hulsen but this was the perception among KG Lindemann, who you will remember had been operating independently for a couple of weeks)

Loong hours at work these days means short hours to work on the Tiger. I need to finish the turret interior and do the final exterior mountings and attachments. The trick is finding the time...

Will he have it done by X-mas? Will he accidently drop it as he hands it over to the Major? What about Naomi?

Stay tuned! :D

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He also claims to have never lost a panzer under his command. (I haven't been able to prove or disprove this yet.)

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So here are some questions and comments from people from "TankNet".

They are not *mine*.

"

Great stuff from the Major!!!!

Did he start off training with 501 alongside of 502 in Germany or did he hook up with 501 in Italy?? He said that the tanks were painted "brown" and we know that 502's were "grey", then I'm thinking that the higher ups already knew that 501 was going to Afrika and during construction, the builders/planners already knew what tanks were going to which group, which would account for the paint differences?

I was always under the impression that the tanks were put in a yard after completion and when a certain number were there, the organization that was next in line would get their tanks or what ever was avail so training could start.

Have you showed him pics of the Early ones and the Bovington one just to see if he knew the difference and is not mistaking the version?? I was under the impression, and I’ll have to double check, but I thought that 502 got the first tanks off assembly, then 501 got theirs, then 502 again and 503. So this would mean that production was slowed up so the painting of 501’s 10?? Tigers could be painted “brown”!! Then production was switched over again to “grey”. If this was the case, no wonder why the Germans had assembly issues.

Thanks

Ron

"

"

Ask the Major how he liked commanding the Tiger?? Did he like it more than what he had before?? How did he like commanding a Group?? Did he ever get a dressing down by Rommel or his commanding officer?? Did he lead from the front during operations?? What were most of his kills, Shermans, Grants, Crusaders??

Thanks

Ron

"

"

Hi,

A good friend of mine, Oberfeldwebel Siegfried Krebs who died in 2004, statet that he was the commander of 112 and was one of the first Tigers who entered Tunisia. He had his tank till the very end in Tunis and ordered his crew to destroy his Tiger which took part then. He was told "Kommodore" by his crew members. May be Mr. Lindemann knows him. Picture shows Oberfeldwebel Krebs with his crew in Tunisia.

index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=396

Regards,

"

"

Not to nick pick the Tiger model, but it is wrong. You have a hodge podge of Early & Production stuff going on. The front fenders don't go with the straight side fenders. They should be the slopped ones. The tow cables should be the other way around with the eyes facing rear. The lights should be attached to the hull front plate, not the hull top. Plus the exhaust covers are the round ones, when the Major said they were the squared off ones.

This was why I asked my first question on his tank. Was it the first batch that came over or the second batch that included the Bovington Tiger. Big differences between the two.

Anyway, like the dio, looks cool!!

Ron

"

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Wow! Thanks for the cross post maj0rtom! I'll try to answer as much as I can. Anything I can't, I will refer to Mr Lindemann when I talk to him again. Probably wednesday..

So here are some questions and comments from people from "TankNet".

They are not *mine*.

"

Great stuff from the Major!!!!

Did he start off training with 501 alongside of 502 in Germany or did he hook up with 501 in Italy?? He said that the tanks were painted "brown" and we know that 502's were "grey", then I'm thinking that the higher ups already knew that 501 was going to Afrika and during construction, the builders/planners already knew what tanks were going to which group, which would account for the paint differences?

I was always under the impression that the tanks were put in a yard after completion and when a certain number were there, the organization that was next in line would get their tanks or what ever was avail so training could start.

Have you showed him pics of the Early ones and the Bovington one just to see if he knew the difference and is not mistaking the version?? I was under the impression, and I’ll have to double check, but I thought that 502 got the first tanks off assembly, then 501 got theirs, then 502 again and 503. So this would mean that production was slowed up so the painting of 501’s 10?? Tigers could be painted “brown”!! Then production was switched over again to “grey”. If this was the case, no wonder why the Germans had assembly issues.

Thanks

Ron

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From TN:

"

Hi Again,

Hope you didn't take offense with me saying your Tiger is wrong. Just wanted to point out a few items. Mostly it's with the side fenders. They should have been the slopping ones that followed the hull, but the main point is that you have the ends on the front and back fender pieces. They should be open. They didn't close them until latter.

Keep up the good interviewing!! I'm actually re-doing everything starting with his service and capture, to his view on the Tiger, dealling with the Allies, to crew stuff. I like this first person account stuff!!

Oh, by the way, don't rely to heavely on that MMIR Tiger book. It does have errors in it. I'm into the SS Tigers from the Kursk time frame and the book had depicted that one wrong, then I noticed a few other errors, but it's still a good research book.

Ron

"

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Hey guys, awesome thread. I would like to add a few things. "ZIMMERIT" look it up on Wikipedia. It is a pasty substance only used by the Germans to keep magnetic mines, especially in Russia off their tanks(look for any german tank that has a corduroy or lined 3Dish pattern on the outside). I have a picture of a Panther covered by Zimmerit from the Candadian equivalent of Aberdeen proving grounds in Camp Borden, Ontario(captured By the Canadian Army during WW2), but I am too computer unsavvy to post it. So Gerry was obviously worried aboot sappers. Also, I have a grandfather who was a WW2 vet in the Royal Canadian Engineers(he helped blast and dig to build the gun tunnels in Gibraltar or "Jib" he would call it) and toured some unknown part of North Africa while on leave. Then he joined the Royal Canadian Regiment because he became bored and wanted to see some action on the front lines(he talked about clean up as an engineer in North Africa and Italy of scraping burnt grease piles from tanks, bulldozing Gerry corpses etc., once he cried and ranted about brave Polish soldiers slaughtered and piled up in trucks like cordwood on a drunken occasion. He then went on as infantry to Italy, and with the Canadian army to liberate the exact area we are playing WW2O in, namely Belgium, and Holland(including the infamous Bridge at Arnhem).

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Here you go Werner, Tzu posted this some time ago, so easier to post than thumb through all 18 pages. :P

10101098le8cv.jpg

P.S. Tzu also posted a photo somewhere in here of the Major and some others standing next to a captured Stuart, but I forgot to save it.

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Happy Holidays to all of you guys wherever you are and however you celebrate!

Isn't that bloody thing done YET!?

(I know exactly how the Rats feel about the word "soon". Lindemann has heard it so many times from me......)

I plan on working on it to-day, maybe I can get some turret pics up....

Working retail during the Holiday season is NOT recommended! :P

The very last picture I will take of this project will be Lindemann holding his Diorama.........

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I have often mentioned this thread to guys while in-world and chatting. Plenty of folks have never seen or heard of this thread which is an absolute shame. Without a doubt, one of the best reads in a forum.

Thanks tzulscha! And that really is a stunning job you've done on the model.

And thanks to everyone that keeps this thread bumped. It blows me away these guys can't sticky this. Go figure.

Merry Xmas to everyone today as well!

Anduril

anduril.jpg

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Heres another of Herr Lindemann back in the day. He's under the arrow.

10101014ef.jpg

Honestly, can one of the MODS come in and tell us why this HASN'T been stickied? Its been the coolest thread in the Motorpool for some time now...

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