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raygunn

World War 2 Veterans

275 posts in this topic

Well this isn't a WW2 vet story but its about my great great great grandfather

He was in the civil war, Confederate, in a Mississippi calvary unit.

He survived the war and came home on a different horse as his oroginal horse had been shot from under him and he received a new one. He also had grown a thick beard during the war.

He came home and my grandmother actually shot him in his left pinky and he lost it because she did not recognize him.

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My grandpa fought in italy 6 months on the italian side, when he was 17, his brigade was fighting the partisan activity that was in the north of italy.

When the war finished he tried to escape, but the "Liberators" (They weren't liberators, they killed everyone that were in company of a german or a fascist) cought him. After few months in prision they released him and few prisioners more. They said: Come on, walk... For they that meant that they will kill them shooting them from the back. They didn't shoot and all the prisioners started to run as fast as they could. Then he had to return to his house, but he was forced to hide in his aunt's house, in the country. He walked 750km without shoes.

Few years after he couldn't go out alone, or the comunists gave him a lynch. So he always was with a friend who was in the "Folgore", an italian airborne division.

Now he lives in Milano and he's 78.

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The only WWII vets in the family were my stepmother's husbands.

Husband #1, her father, ran LSTs in the Pacific and got a Bronze Star for a perfect no-loss landing, afterwards he was assigned to provide forward training for LST drivers and missed out on several nasty landings as a result. Never got above a Lieutenant, and I'm wondering now if he were posted to the training area precisely so he could get home in one piece to his baby girl.

Husband #2 was a marine at Okinawa, and he simply would not talk about it.

My paternal grandfather was a Boeing foreman making B-17s and B-29s in Kansas during the war.

My maternal grandfather tried to get in the war immediately but was told he had too bad eyesight. For two years he drank carrot juice, ate carrot soup, actually changed his skin color from all the Beta Carotene, but in fact DID improve his eyesight. Then he marched right back down to the recruiting office, his eyesight was acknowledged as being acceptable but he was now too old.

Family friend got an industrial medal from the air force for facilitating bomber production.

My maternal great uncle was in WWI aboard DD-34 Walke (the WWI subchaser, not the WWII DD).

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My Dad enlisted in the Army Air Corps while a junior in college, was selected for bombers, and spent some time in training. After training in B25s, he was retrained for the new B29, and became a new copilot assigned to the earliest days of the B29 program flying from deep inland China against Japan, before Okinawa and Saipan were captured and the B29 program moved there.

He copiloted a factory-new B29 down to Brazil, across to Africa, across Africa, to southern Arabia, to Persia, to what's now Pakistan, to eastern India. In all this travel they never got off any of the bases they landed at, and were never on the ground as long as half a day. In India the ground crew stripped most of the guns out of the plane to lighten it, and loaded it with general supplies for the China base--a spare engine and as much fuel in drums as the plane could lift. Then he flew over the Himalayas to inland China, where they started to strip out all the armor and everything else removable. Meanwhile my Dad's crew spent less than one day on the ground and again never got off the base--this time they weren't permitted, to make sure they didn't eat/drink/contact anything that would make them unflightworthy. Then they were given a plane that was already prepared, loaded with a few GP bombs and as much fuel as it would hold, and sent off in the middle of the night on a daylight-over-Japan mission to symbolically bomb some factory complex.

Partway over the Sea of Japan, the formation was intercepted and my Dad's plane was shot up. With one engine burning, they dove out of formation into a cloud, lost the pursuing fighters and luckily got the engine fire out and the prop feathered before the wing failed or blew up. Then they salvoed their bombs, probably killing some fish and maybe startling some Chinese or Japanese fishermen.

They were not just past the point of no return for the base, but past the point of no return for safe bailout over friendly territory. They had been warned that bomber crews bailing out over Japanese-held China were either shot or tortured then shot. The fuel consumption of a B29 is way higher on three engines than four because three engines don't produce enough power to keep the plane at constant altitude except at advanced throttle.

So anyway, the only choice they had was the emergency plan, which was to try to make it to Russian territory. Russia was neutral against Japan. They set a course for Vladivostok by dead reckoning based on where they thought they were. After some time of flying, they were down to nearly empty on fuel and losing altitude because they had cut back the throttles to decrease consumption. They came out of a cloud bank and Vladivostok was right in front of them in the distance.

As they got closer, they could see with binoculars an airstrip on the other side of the harbor, and they headed straight for it at decreasing altitude, prepared to put the gear down at the last second.

A couple of Russian fighters appeared alongside them, waggling wings and waving handkerchiefs at them, and waving their hands. But, there was no radio connection, and they couldn't figure out what the Russians were trying to communicate.

As they got closer to the harbor, they realized through binoculars that the ship sitting crosswise outside the harbor entrance was a cruiser or battleship and there were sailors running around the deck, pulling covers off AA guns and elevating them toward their flight path. At this point, the two Russian fighters zoomed away. Apparently the Russian Navy could see that the plane was a large bomber, and was prepared to shoot them down rather than let them fly a straight path over the Russian Far East Fleet anc****ge.

So, my Dad and the pilot both pulled the plane with all their might into a steep 90 degree turn and flew around the harbor. Then they straightened out, and made it to the ground. Their last action in the plane was to destroy the bombsight, per orders.

Once they were on the ground the initial Russian reaction was very friendly, though none of the Russians spoke English and they spoke no Russian. They were fed and treated well. The next day, some big brass showed up and apparently some intelligence officers, and the atmosphere got a bit more chilly and formal for a while. Eventually, the Russians decided they weren't spies, and began to treat them as interns. They were moved to various locations in southern interior Russia, very loosely guarded because there was nowhere to go, and fed as well as Russian officers which is to say, poorly. However, periodically the Russians would make it clear that they were essentially prisoners. The Russians thought there were Japanese spies within Russia, and they didn't want to give the Japanese any excuse to attack Vladivostok and the other Far East ports, and close off the heavy Lend-Lease traffic of metal ingots and other raw materials, kitted aircraft, railroad equipment, etc., through those ports.

At some point, my Dad's group was combined with other interns, including two later B29 crews, some Army and Navy crews from the Aleutians, and other strays.

My Dad was in Russia for something like six months. He lost something like twenty pounds, and he was pretty thin already. For the first three months or so, he was officially MIA, having last been seen in a burning bomber going down over the Sea of Japan being pursued by Japanese fighters. My grandparents thought he had been killed. Eventually some US military attache stationed somewhere in Russia to coordinate Lend-Lease, presumably also OSS, got word to the Embassy in Moscow that my Dad's crew was there and all alive, and the word eventually got back to my grandparents. That was probably a high-stress day in Fenton, Michigan...it must not be fun having a military car arrive at your front door when your son has been MIA for months, but instead the message was that he was alive and OK but they couldn't say where he was.

Eventually, the Russians decided that the Japanese were going down for the count, and the OSS made some sort of deal to get the intern group out via a guarded rail trip across the Stans to north of Persia, then into Lend-Lease trucks with the canvas covers tied shut to keep any spies from reporting the presence of American flyers, then overland into Persia, then onto OSS planes back across Arabia and to Italy where my Dad's crew was put on a Liberty ship headed slowly back to the US.

When my Dad got to New Jersey he was still on active duty, and he was given a leave but no transportation. So, he got a train seat to Chicago, hoping he could get a bus to Fenton north of Detroit. But, there wasn't any bus running that route, so my Granddad drove all the way to Chicago to get him.

My Dad was covered by orders not to talk about having been an intern in Russia until about 1990.

The Russians eventually cloned the B29--my Dad's ex-plane appears in a variety of books on Russian aircraft development, being the most flightworthy of the three planes the Russians got, and was mis-identified in a Smithsonian Magazine article on the internee episode a couple of years ago. The internees hold reunions annually now, and have a newsletter.

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My memory is a bit rusty, but a relative of ours told my mother this story.

He was station west of Stalingrad, with a german army unit, after the 6th got trapped in the city, they were part of the units trying to break trough.

Seemingly his squadron was shot to pieces, he was left on the battlefield wounded, when the sovjets advanced they used dogs to sniff out survivors and shoot them, so I think he was in the Schutzstaffel troops.

I don't know how he survived, but he returned to his lines during the night, and survived the war.

However this scarred him so , that he could not sleep in the same room as his wife, for if she would make a move during the night, he could accidentally injure or damage her in his sleep.

This person is dead now.

Janster

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Grandfather on my mother's side (french Alsacian) had the doubtfull honour to fight both in both the french army and the german.

French army during the 'phoney war 1939 / 1940 and the collapse in 1940.

When the germans found out he was Alsacian (which the german consider as german people) he was enroled by force in the wermacht like hundreds of thousands of other Alsacians, and integrated in a german unit. They were sent to the eastern front. He survived it, came back in 1944 and was lucky that his unit got annihilated before he could be sent back to the front. He managed to escape the rest of the war and lived till his early 90s, but would never tell us much about 'his' war.

Grandfather on my father's side (Polish) was a pre war ski champion (cross country ski) He escaped to France in 1939 with his Polish mountain troops brigade. Fought alongside the french alpine troops in 1940, turning off a few badly prepared attacks from the Italians who wanted a bite of the french cake. He escaped to Switzerland when the french surrendered and spent the rest of the war there, doing ski competitions under a false name as he was supposed to stay in a 'prisoner' camp in Switzerland due to the country's neutral status. After the war he married a french woman, and lived in France until this year, when he died at the age of 93.

His most vivid memories of the war was of allied bombardments on some german held city, just across the mountain and the border from his 'camp' in Switzerland. They'd sneak out and climb up a mountain to have a view, and he said the night bombardments where so intense it felt like you could see as if it was full daylight.

Early in the war he also had a medal for saving several of his platoon who were wounded and under heavy fire, but he never wanted to elaborate on the circumstances.

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My grandfather was drafted at the age of 19 (?) and was stationed at the Philly Naval yards. He was pulled directly out of college. His job was to purify the uranium that would go into the then secret atomic bombs. He, because of his secret job, was a Petty officer Specialist-X and had to live in the local YMCA so that he would not talk to other soldiers about his work.

He recently passed away.

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On my mothers side:

My grandfather fought the Russians in the Finnish Winter war. He was stationed in the far north.

He was never the same man when he got back.

They had a russian prisoner of war working on thier farm and he was shot by Stalins men when he got back as a traitior.

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My father was with the US 4th Inf. Div on D-Day. He always commented on how little they knew about what was going on. They just knew what was within their immediate area, which vacillated rapidly from being relatively calm, to all hell breaking loose, and back to calm.

On D-Day +10 days they were caught in a barrage of 88 artillery. He woke up a couple of weeks later in England where they were still digging pieces of gravel out of him. He spent the rest of the war in a hospital. He was the only one from his squad who survived the war. He had seen all his buddies die in the ten days after D-Day.

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My granddad was a pilot on the Western front.

One day he was wounded by AA shells but survived and managed to rtb. The doctors operated the frags out of his body. He kept those AA frags in a small box until his death in 2002.

He got the EK2 and the "Frontflugspange".

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Maternal grandfather signed up with the Canadian army (can't remember which unit at the moment) when the Allies liberated the Zeelands (dutch part) in '44. He wasn't old enough to fight in the beginning of the war. He met my grandmother when he was put in her parental home after the Allies liberated the middle part of the Netherlands (around Utrecht/Amersfoort).

Mosquit

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my grandfather was an LTA (lighter than air) commander for the navy during the start of ww2. when the blimp programs got cut he was moved to a navigator for a transportation unit in the pacific. he was one of the first to land at iwo during the battle and was also the navigator for the first plane to land in japan after the treaty was signed. he continued to serve through korea and was in command of a trans company that flew in and out of korea during the war. he retired from the navy and joined the navy reserves and the army corp of engineers. when he retired from the navy all together he was an O-7 and when he retired from the corp of engineers he was the in charge of the corp of engineers in the pacific northwest. what amazed me is during all of that he mustered out 2 masters degrees and a doctorate. he truely is a man that i look up to personally.

my grandfathers brother was one of the few survivors of the arizona when it went up in pearl harbor. he told me that and then never told me another thing about his experiences during the war. he never even told my grandfather anything he had done after that pearl harbor.

there is also a man, who just passed away, who went to my wifes church who was a dolittle raider and was one of the lucky ones to make it out alive. he had written a book about his experiences, but i can't recall the name of it. ill ask my wife when she gets home from work and see if she can remember the name of it.

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My GrandDad, who still lives in Tennessee at the age of 92 and still fixing cars was involved in N Africa Campaign and Italy. He was a mechanic and drove the Ducks. He received a Purple Heart for receiving a pieve of Shrapnel in the back from a JU-87. He never talked about the war to anyone until the day I enlisted into the US Army Infantry a little over 10 years ago. He told me stories for hours and then he took me to his basement. He had taken "illegally" a German Luger, A German Paratrooper helmet and some other items. When my cousins found out they wanted to sell it but I talked him into donating them to a Muesuem. My Granddad rocks!! And yes I am a 31 year old man saying that..

S! to Blaine Hartley

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This isn't my family..not sure what any of them were up to during this time, but about an ex's father. He was a 12 year old sniper in Spain's Blue Company (going off of memory so the name might not be exactly right.) He never told me many stories about the war itself. I do know that he was awarded an Iron Cross and was very proud of it. Still wore it on suit jackets. He told me that had been known as Eagle Eye because of his keen eyesight. Told me this as he was going in for an operation to repair one of his eyes and how funny and frustrated this was for him. He ended up working for and retiring as a Lt. Colonel, I believe, in the Spanish police.

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My Grandfather on my Mothers side enlisted into the Navy Seabees (CBMU 251 if memory serves) in 41 served to 45, was stationed on Tulagi and Okinawa, had a few close encounters with the enemy held up in caves and a friendly aircraft who popped out of the clouds without radioing. Grandpa at the time was manning a .50 cal AAA gun aboard a destroyer out to sea. Just as he was about to open up on him, the guy called in.

My Grandfather on my Dad's side was a medic in the 179th Infantry Regiment part of the 45th Infantry Division. Took part in the landings on Sicialy, where in a town called Mistretta, he was wounded and spent the rest of the war in a hospital. Unfortunately he died when I was very young, and all his stories (if he would have spoken about them) are lost forever.

My Second Cousin on my Dad's side served as a radio operator on board a TBM-3e Avenger (part of VC-10). His flight was stationed on board the USS Gambier Bay, escort carrier CVE-73 (860 crew). It was part of a group of ships comprised of six escort carriers, screened by three destroyers and four destroyer escorts, known as Taffy 3. He fought in the battles for the Mariannas, Tinian, Guam, and Leyte Gulf. It was in the Battle of Leyte Gulf when his task force steamed off the coast of Samar, at day break when they encountered 20 ships from the Japanese Center Force. During the engagment Gambier Bay was riddled with shells and left dead in the water. At the time my cousin was in the hangar bay helping to carry and injured crewman on a stretcher when he caught a piece of shell in his left shoulder. After a galant attempt by the destroyer escorts to save her, Gambier Bay capsized and sank. My Cousin then spent three days in a life raft, one of which was his 19th birthday. His present, an extra ration of water. Nearly 800 of the ships survivors were rescued aswell.

cve73pic5io.jpg

If you look closely at the right side on the horizon , you can make out the Japanese cruiser firing on the Gambier Bay. (above photo)

gbatsamar7ku.jpg

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Get ready for a long one,

Mom's side

Grandpa : Served in CBI(China ,Burma, India,) Theatre. Was in the Air Corps. Flew over the hump and got weather for bombers at his airbase. He also worked with the OSS and gave me his OSS Knife. Saw some Japanese planes,and was mabye bombed by them. There was also a Tiger around that was eating people

Great Uncle: Served in Navy Minesweeper in atlantic

Dad's side

Grandpa: Was a kid-teen in World War Two but later served in the Navy during Korea on a carrier and did Administrative jobs and some flying with his squadron. His carriers were harrasing Chinease and Russian subs by dropping dumby bombs on them among other things. Gave me his navy manual, his medals, and his stripes jacket and hat.

Grandpa's Uncles:

Uncle Fred: Served in 9th infantry division 84th Field Artillery. Was a liason who was up with Infantry and directed fire for artillery. Was wounded several times and still has shrapnel in him. Saw alot of combat in

Africa:Landed in first few waves

Sicily : Landed soon after initial waves

France :landed on D+4

Belgium

Germany

Uncle Buell: 15th Airforce in Italy Crew Chief for repairing the bombers did welding among other things

Uncle Earl: 29th Infantry Division 115th Infantry Regiment. Got a bursted ear drum. Landed on D-Day on Easy Red beach in first few hours. Was the only survivor of a battle.

Fought in

France

Belgium

Germany

My Grandma's relatives

Uncle Paul: In U.S. Army never talked about it.

Not World War two relatives but my Great Great Great Grandpa was in Confederate army in Civil war was at pickets charge, and many other battles. His brothers, and cousins were on both the Union and Confederate side. My Mothers Grandfather was Pharmacists mate on Boats in World War 1.

Also my cousin is planning on going to be a pilot in the marine corps, and will go to boot next summer, and will go in after that year of college. My other cousin wants to be in the Airforce after getting out of college

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Fathers side:

Grandpa - took part in the siege of Leningrad, bunker got hit by artillery and the lost a leg. Returned home after this.

Granduncle - died somwhere in russia

Mothers side:

Grandpa: Leutnant in 25. Panzerdivision, radiooperator. Lost contact to division with his platoon in early '44 when he was sent to check a destroyed cable.

When he returned the whole company left. Month later being washed westwards with retreating troops he found the remains of the division around Warzaw. Friends told him, that the divison was nearly completely destroyed only a few days after they left him behind.

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My Uncle on my Father's side was in Europe. He was a jeep scout for Patton's 3rd army. I got a chance to talk to him about it a few years before he died (cancer).

Some of the stories were crazy. He told me about the time he and his 2 buds drove their jeep thru a german held town, and the Germans waved at him, lol. Another time he climbed up a flagpole to get a German battle flag ( he still had it, signed by the guys in his unit) while under fire.

I have some pictures of his jeep, they welded sheet metal to it to stop small arms fire. Also have a picture of a knocked out tiger tank, some pictures of an over run LW airfield with him sitting the cockpit of a 190 ( no idea what varient).

I miss him. :(

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France

-Grand pa 1 (father side):

Born in 1896, mobilized in 1914, was at Verdun in 1916. Reserve officer during the interwar period.

Mobilized once again in 1936 as an officer in the Train (supply), stationned behind the Maginot Line with Spanish Republican workers. Moved to the Aisne front by late May 1940 and retreated safely (but with some funny adventures) to the South of France. Was dismobilized by October 1940.

-Grand pa 2 (mother side): joined the Free Polish (as he was a Polish immigrant) Army in France during the Phoney War. Was evacuated at Dunkirk but his ship got sunk by a Stuka. He survived an unfortunately landed on the German held beaches. Got emprisonned in a temporary POW camp. Escaped with 2 french jewish POWs, got shot but succeeded. Felt sick because he had to swim for a long time. Took him 6 months to return home (well, to my grand ma) in occupied France by walking by night and working in farms to eat. Remained discret for the rest of the occupation.

-Great uncle: still alive. Joined the french resistance at 17, made some sabotaging and made raids against collaborators. Then escaped from occupied France through Spain and enlisted with Free France in French North Africa.

Joined a colonial ID and fought with the french expeditionnary corp in Italy. Fought at the battle of the Garigliano (Monte Cassino, roughly), which were really nasty according to him. He faced both german and italian fascists, that he used to execute when they surrendered to avenge his algerian buddies who were systematically executed (when taken POW) by the units in front of him.

He still owns few items he took to the Germans while he was in the resistance, such as a still operationnal potato masher grenade that he enjoys waving during family lunches, making his wife yelling all the time he does that...

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Well, where to start...

On my father's side, I have two uncles who both served in WWII. Uncle Charles was with the 2nd Ranger Batallion in England while they were training for D-Day. They were making one last practice cliff assault when the rope he was climbing snapped and he fell about 50 feet to the beach. He waved everyone off and told them he was okay - which was a lie. For three days he managed to hide the agony he was in, but his company commander finally ordered him to the infirmary. Turns out he had a broken hip. His commander told him that hiding the injury constituted a courtmarshal offense, but that he was just going to send him stateside where he could be treated and mustered out. Uncle Charles missed D-Day by about a week - and missed possibly being one of the 30% casualties his platoon took during the invasion.

Uncle Harry served in the Army Air Corps. His tour of duty was rather interesting, since he was assigned to a flight unit that was TDY to the OSS under Bill Donovan. Uncle Harry was a Tech Sgt., but had a flight priority that allowed him to bump anyone on a flight below 3-star rank. He still won't talk about much of what he did, but we know that he made regular flights from the US to Switzerland and Spain to repatriate downed US fliers. All those flights were made in civilian marked transports with the crews wearing civilian airline uniforms. After the Germans surrendered his aircraft (Uncle Harry was crew chief of a C-54) was transferred to the Pacific, where they flew missions to various places carrying cargoes and personnel for special operations. The last missions they flew before returning stateside were ferrying a group of scientists, diplomats and high-ranking officers to the Japanese home islands - before the official surrender documents were signed. They found out later that one of the groups was the delegation who were to arrange the surrender ceremonies, and the group of scientists were there to observe the results of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. He says that landing an unarmed transport on a Japanese airfield covered with Japanese soldiers, fliers and flak batteries was a rather interesing experience.

My father was just a bit too young to serve during active hostilities in WWII. He served in the Army Air Force starting in 1946 to 1948 installing radar systems all over North and South America. He was recalled to service with the US Air Force in 1950 and stayed in until 1953. The unit he was with was a photo recon outfit that flew RB-29 aircraft out of Mountain Home AFB, Idaho. Most of those flights were to Soviet airspace. Those photos of Sakhalin Island that were shown on TV when the Korean Air Lines 747 was shot down by the Russians were taken by his outfit. It wasn't until just a few years ago that a lot of what his unit did was declassified, such as the fact that it lost 12 aircraft in 2 years to Russian fighters while probing Russian air defenses over the Arctic Ocean. One thing that doesn't get mentioned is that many of those "recon" bombers carried a bombardier, had their Norden bombsights installed, and had atomic bombs on board while flying "recon" flights.

On my mothers side of the family there's my Uncle Son. He served with the 2nd Marind Division in the Pacific. He doesn't talk much about the war, but we know that he saw combat during the operations on Tarawa and Saipan, but was hospitalized after that for disentery, if I recall correctly. I remember my mother saying that when he came home, he was in a bad way mentally and wasn't a very nice person to know. A few years of heavy drinking and a lifetime as a long-haul trucker were required to lay some of his ghosts to rest.

There are other members of my extended family that served, but I don't know where or with which units. Oh, and just FYI, both of my grandfathers served in WWI, one as a Marine, one in the Army.

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Hi All

Had a varied and diverse range of relatives in uniform during WW2.

My Gramps (Anthony) served in the Canadian Navy RCNVR and was seaman on a Flower Class Corvette the HMCS Eyebright during the Battle of the Atlantic.

Great Uncle Bill served as an ASDIC operator in the Canadian Navy on a River Class Destroyer Battle of the Atlantic.

My Great Uncle Paul served in the Essex Scottish Regiment of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division England , France & NW Europe 42-45 Also did some occupation duty with US Army postwar Japan.

My Great Uncle Herman served in the Essex Scottish Regiment of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division England , France & NW Europe 42-45 Also did some occupation duty in postwar Germany.

Great Uncle Leo Western Canada Royal Canadian Infantry Corps Homefront defence.

My Great Uncle Evan served in the 82nd Airborne "All American" as an NCO saw alot of combat from what I understand.

My Great Uncle Jimmie (James) RCAF Lancaster bomber pilot full tour Europe bombing Reich.

Great Uncles Norman and Joseph (brothers) Royal Canadian Infantry Corps. Unsure of regiment but Uncle Norman was wounded and lost an eye. Possible French Canadian unit trying to identify regiment.

Proud of all of them.

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I'm friends with the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.

http://www.doolittleraid.com/

Especially MSgt Edwin Horton, who lives in my town. I took him to visit his navigator Sally Crouch who is in a nursing home four states away. They're the only two left from their B-25 crew that are still alive.

edsally.JPG

I have a video clip of Ed, knowing they will never see eachother again, saying good-bye to Sally after their resent visit.

http://members.cox.net/flooring/

Recently I took Ed to Arlington National Cemetery to see his old boss.

1.JPG

Out of 80 Doolittle Tokyo Raiders, they're only 17 left.

group2.JPG

sally.JPG

In the above picture you see a quote from General Doolittle saying "Until the Last Man." Go here for details:

http://www.doolittleraider.com/the_goblets.htm

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My Grandfathers brother, Claude Wiltshire, fought in WW1 with the 36th Division - T patcher!

My Grandfather fought the Japanese in Burma with General Stillwell. Later he was recruited by the OSS in China.

My Uncle Served on the Anti-Aircraft Crusier San Franciso in the Pacific, saw action at Tarrawa to Okinawa, Siapan.

My Aunt-N-Law was a Nurse on the frontline aid station with Patton in North Africa, Sicily and Italy.

Have three other realatives buried at Normandy.

Richard Reno was a true American hero - He served with the 36th Division in WW2 and just recently past away in August of this year. You can find out more about him by going to this URL which we put up as a memorial to this man on the 1st RCM web ste. http://dfwmetrousedcars.com/33rd/reno.htm

Not sure where the world would be today had not these men and women in the States, England and yes France not answered the call and made the sacrafices! They truely were the greatest generation!

Chasf

33_chasf_46860.jpg

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