raygunn

World War 2 Veterans

275 posts in this topic

All I know is my Mom's Dad was a Sherman driver on D-Day. He was wounded around Bastogne in Battle of the Bulge. He doesn't like to talk about it.

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Father was Royal Navy - served from 1939 to 1945 - survived 2 sinkings. Family bombed out twice. Grandfather (former Argyll And Sutherland in WWI) retired by WWII, but recalled to duty and served as a REME major. (involved with testing the Churchill tank when it was new) Lots of other members served....

Scotsman

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My Dad was a combat engineer in WW2 and Korea. He was in the D-Day landing on Omaha beach. He also had 2 brothers who fought in WW2.

Moms brother also fought in WW2.

All made it through OK.

Dad has never talked much about being in the wars, mostly of people he knew and occasionaly about some close friends that died.

He has told us some about the battle of the buldge and the fighting around remagan. A little about Korea as well but again more about how cold the winters were and such.

Dad mostly talks about his time in England and Ireland before the invasion and how friendly the people were.

And of Korea his most told story is of driving Dinaha Shore from one USO show to another. For whatever reason they did'nt have regular transport and Dad ended up driving her in his HT. She told him how as a girl growing up in the swamps she would go gater hunting with her grandpa.

But as to the fighting part Dad mostly just says he was there to do the job his country sent him to do and the german soldiers were there doin the job their country sent them to do. He just figgured to do his job best.

Mom's brother told me about being in the same outfit with Chet Atkins and playing guitar with him while in england waiting for d-day.

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My Mother's first husband, not my Father, was a B-17 Bombardier.

I'm not sure of the details but in the bombers you were only required to fly 30 missions and then you went home. He was killed in action, over Berlin, on his 30th mission.

My Father served from 41-45 in Europe. He was a communications guy. Strung telephone wire behind our lines and off and on behind enemy lines as well.

Never said a dang word to me about that War except for one instance. He told me he was stringing wire behind enemy lines or in this case where the actual front lines were fluid and was up on a telephone pole.

He said artillery fire was coming into the area but he didn't give it a second thought. "If it hits the telephone pole oh well...."

Then he said: "But if a sniper opened fire you dropped, and you dropped fast and right now, even if you broke your damn leg."

That was all I ever got out of him and I don't even remember how I got that out of him.

He passed away in July of 2003.

Until we see a Submarine....

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I'm old enough to remember the boys in the neighborhood returning from Europe and the Pacific. They didn't talk much about it then. I recall a neighbor who had a silver star in a shoebox in his workshop. I pestered him about it and he mumbled something about how a tank took a hit from an 88. He said "I couldn't see leaving those guys out there." That's all he would say. My dad was a WWI vet, who was in the observer corps during WW II. I got to see Viet Nam, up close and personal. That's another story...

RodeKill

Chief Bullet Magnet

10th Mtn Div

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OK, the best that I can do....

My Dad was in the OSS during WWII, sworn to secrecy so he doesn't talk about it much.

My Step-Father was on the USS Phoenix, at Pearl Harbor, his ship survived the war, was sold to Argentina, and sunk by a Brit sub. during the Falkland conflect. He dislikes any person of Japenese decent (with good reason I think), and doesn't think too highly of Brits anymore .

My Unlce was a Bombiader/Navigator on a B-29.

My Grandfather on my Mother's side served in WWI.

My Grandfather on my Father's side was in the Merchant Marines. He survived the Battle of the Atlantic {both of them} (had 3 ships sunk under him).

One of my Great Uncles (Mother's cousin or some such). Served in the Army, made the landings at Anzio, spend 3 weeks behind enemy lines, he never spoke about it much. However he knew my interest and showed me some "souvineers" he had collected from a "captuerd German Bunker".

I served in the Navy (CB's) during Desert Storm.

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One grandfather joined the USNR and became a radio repairman. I think he was stationed in the Phillipines, don't know if he ever got attacked or anything.

Other grandfather was an artillery spotter (US army) in Europe. I think he was the one that flew planes and spotted for the artillery, I can't really remember... he died before I could really learn about him. )= I was only 2 when he did.

The real question should be "Who's grandpa/father WASN'T a World War 2 veteran?" Seems like every man of fighting age at that time was, well, fighting.

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Being from a fishing community in Scotland, one of my grandfathers was in the navy. He was stationed on a minesweeper and was involved in the Dunkirk evacuations, and then after that was located off South Africa, where he tells me the most action he saw was protecting the NAAFI boats and when the locals went on strike! I still talk to him about his war experiences, but he doesn't talk about the Dunkirk evacuations much, I think it must not have been too pleasant an experience so I don't really press him on it.

A not so pleasant surprise also awaited him when he got home. He had his savings under his mattress in his mothers house (literally under the mattress) from his time on the fishing boats before he left, and when he returned his brother had spent the lot! He told him that the family expected that he wouldn't make it back so they just went ahead and spent it!

My other grandfather was in the RAF (ground crew) and was stationed first in North Africa, then posted to the far east at the end of the African campaign. He told me that the scariest experience he had was when his airfield in North Africa was attacked by Stuka's, an experience I'm sure that would have got anyone's heart thumping. Apart from that dysenteri and seasickness on the troop ships seem to have been the worst he experienced, or at least that's what he always complained to me about! Unfortunately he died last year, but I managed to rescue his medals from a box that my uncle was just about to take down to skip.

My other grandfathers medals are sadly gone. One of my uncles brought them to school to show his friends many years ago and they have never been seen since.

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my grandpaw was in pattons 5th army...lucky for me he got hurt-sick on the night of shipout to germany.he prob would have been killed there and i and most of my family would have nvr existed.:rolleyes:.it would have been weired if he went anyways as my side of the family-GP's side came from germany...so it was for the best.

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my great grandfather on my dads mothers side was on a USN destroyer during the first world war he died in 1950.

one of my great cousins was a US army pilot in the Pacific shooting down a few japanese planes. my great grandmother claimed he was an ace but ive never found any record of.

my grandfathers brother in law was an SBD pilot and served in the battle of midway at 16 years of age and when he was flying back he fell asleep at the wheel somehow and went offcourse but he eventually found his ship. he later served in the same squadron as george bush and took part in the attack on the battleship yamamoto. he died 5 years ago.

my grandpas older brother was a c47 copilot who took place in market garden and the crossing of the rhine.

another one of my great uncles was lt in the infantry in korea who signed up to be a cook but ended up going to the front lines. he was telling me that many of his troops were black.

my dads secretary served 4 terms in vietnam as a marine. dont know much about him.

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My grandfather was a MP in Paris, France. His four older brothers were in the Army; three of them dying in the war.

I still get nostalgic whenever i think about the stories he told me about life during the war; even though he always talked in french tongue, it was the only time i seen him cry. I still remember him showing me all the things he had kept from the war.

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My wifes uncle was killed at Normandy, his name was JOHN THOMAS KELLINGTON FERGUSON.

He was a Lance Corporal in the Royal Canadian Engineers.

Seems he was exempt from military service due to his large family and peacetime job but he enlisted anyway.

He was killed on a Normandy beachhead placing Bangalore torpedos to blow barbed wire that was stalling the advance.

He's buried in Bayeux Cemetery. See the site, look to the bottom.

http://www.cwgc.org/search/SearchResults.aspx?surname=ferguson&initials=J&war=2&yearfrom=1900&yearto=1944&force=Army&nationality=2&send.x=0&send.y=0

*********

7 years later my father was in Korea as a Royal Canadian Engineer along with my uncle (his brother), another engineer.

He had some interesting stories about laying mines, then moving them around every night. Boobytrapping them, because the Chinese/N.Koreans would sneak out and move your own mines. Seems he won that game because he came back.

About illuminating the enemy during N Korean night attacks from several miles away with AA searchlights. Can you imagine trying to attack into a searchlight? Highlighted and blinded while the defenders were in shadow in a prepared defence, protected in trenches and killing your friends by the thousands.

The brits called them sappers. And as a sapper he went out and blew up 2 T34's that had been disabled in earlier attacks. He said it was quite simple, gasoline in the turret and back of the engine and 2 grenades (taped together) down the hatch. The explosion and shrapnel sliced open the ready shell casings to expose the powder, the fire ignited it, and Kaboom.

Anti-Mines he laid killed 2 more tanks, he saw the explosions, then the crew bailing. The tanks were blown/destroyed later. In many cases they would be booby trapped by the allies to kill the tank recovery crews who were a skilled resource the enemy couldn't afford to lose.

90% of all the mine fields were laid at night. The rule was, if you laid the mine, you were the one to go get it when it came time to move them. If anything looked dodgy about the mine site, they were to boobytrap the area, mark it and move on. Many times he heard late night explosions for no apparent reason.

Note - he said it was common practise to lay and relay a mine 50+ times. Pressure mines, Anti-tank, trip wire mines and tripflares etc. They would lay them, advance (or retreat) and they would take their mines with them.

*********

Note - my grandfather was at the Doiran Lake battles in WW1 ... yes as a Royal Canadian Engineer. Must be in my blood.

I have his cap badge, paybook, medals and pictures of my uncle, dad and grandfather.

All taken when they were about the same age. All with the same cap badge.

I disappointed them all by joining the infantry. Advancement in the peacetime engineers was EXTREMELY slow.

Dbx

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My Grandfather was in the 501st. I have his discharge papers somewhere with all of the places he was in. He was a busy man.

I am not sure the specifics of my Wife's Grandfather, but I know he was in the European Theatre and was a pony mechanic.

Please post here to tell about your realtives who fought in the war

I will start

My grandfather on my mothers side was in the U.S. Navy

He joined when he was 17, lieing about his age. He was stationed in Guam for training. Unfortunatley or Fortunatley he completed his training at wars end and never saw fighting.

My grandfather on my fathers side was a lot younger and Joined the army post ww2 and was stationed in the american section of Berlin. I'm not sure what he did and have never really talked to him about it, he joined the memphis police department afterward and retired with the rank of Captain.

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My dad was drafted in Oct of '41, and after Camp Wallace, Houston, Texas, was transferred to Fort Crockett, Galveston, Texas, with the 20th Coastal Artillery, Company B. After about four months, (medical reasons), was transferred to South Camp Hood, Prisoner of War Camp, Killeen, Texas. Now Fort Hood. This POW Camp was for the German enlisted prisoners. I believe that these were some of the first to the US and may have been part of the Afrika Korp, as some of the POWs were Czech and my dad was assigned as an interpretor. While there till the end of the war, he as a POW guard.

My mom at that time was working at the Fairmont Creamery that processed milk into the powdered milk, and eggs into the powdered eggs for the War Department.

My uncle Ernest, was with the USA in India and Burma, and was somehow involved with Burma Road.

My mom's cousin, Anna, was a 1st Lt, with the USA, in India as a nurse and did some teaching as a nurse instructor.

My uncle Lawrence was in the Navy and his ship transported equipment, tanks, trucks, and troops to the retaking of the Philippines.

This is about all that I have of my family that was involved in WWII, and a lot of it went to the grave and seems to be lost. I have a couple of cousins that are doing some family research and my find some info to fill the gaps.

So, thanks to all for sharing.

From Nebraska

"Woomera"

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My wifes grandfather was a loader in an M7 priest and fought at the battle of the bulge, mostly in St. Vith. He was in the 7th Armored and eventually pushed through and met the Russians atthe end of the war.

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At Fathers side:

Grandpa was a foundation member of the NS-Party, joined the SA (pre war). He served at 16. (E) Kompanie 42. Inf Reg. at eastern front - Sewastopol and later till Kaukasus. Then defence of Germany, after war prison in Bamberg - died 1960

Uncle (fathers brother) served in RAD (pre war) then western front till Brest - after that eastern front. I got his medals with documents ( EKI, EKII, Ritterkreuz - for blowing 52 sovijet tanks with magnetic mines - serveral other medals some in bronce, silver and gold) woundet by shrapnell in the back and transportet back to germany, where he died.

Mothers side:

Her father fought at eastern front too - died in Stalingrad.

Several other Uncles (about 6 ) of my family served in the german army (Norway, North Africa Western and Eastern Front) - none of them returned from the front.

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My neighbors late husband was a B-17 Tail Gunner. I belive he once told me that a German 109 (What he actually said was it was green and yellow. He didn't know the names just that they were enemies :P) rammed the right side of the aircraft he was in, didn't damage the B-17 but the right side gunner tore the wing of the 109 off.

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My great grandfather served in WW2 in the Polish Wing of the RAF in a bomber.He also got the Polish Medal of Honor

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My Uncle was a top turret gunner, radio operator in the 8th air force. He never really talks much about the war, guess he saw too much bad **** on the runs to germany and etc. He did say that when he saw his 1st P-38 he thought it was one of the most incredible aircraft he ever saw at the time.

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My Great Uncle Hans was a fighter pilot in the Luftwaffe. I never met him, all I have is a picture of him in uniform and the stories my Grandpa told me before he died. He told me that during the last weeks of the war he was constantly being sent out to shoot down Allied bombers over Germany. He got shot down and landed (via parachute of course) a block from his house. He went home, took his uniform off and that was that lol. Cant blame him.

Ive seen other pictures of relavtives in German uniform but I could never get names, units or fronts. I do intend to contact the wAST office in Berlin someday to try to get all of their records for archive and research purposes.

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i know no one cares about me or my heritage' date=' just doing it in honor of a dead soldaten of the german army, so dont get on me.[/quote'] I spent a couple years in a reenactment group,2nd SS, 11th Panzer Div. 3rd Groupe. All who were caught up in that time we remember. I have a 100% combat/field ready WWII Waffen SS panzer grenadier uniform. 50% of my gear original. I lost some relatives trying to get out of Germany. In Jan, 2006 the Isreal goverment awarded my uncle and 4 remaing vets of his unit a medal for liberating a women's concentration camp, my grandpa built Liberty ships and was on his way to Japan when the bomb was dropped. My great grandpa was in the most decorated Marine unit of WWI. A German soldier he fought against in many battles moved down the road from him. He had 3 grand daughters the same age as me and my 2 brothers. We were good freinds with them. My dad did 2 tours in Nam as a forward observer, 98 in his class of forward observers 2 survived the war, him being 1 the other badly injured. 1 of my uncles went to Korea when he was 15 years old. He dosent say much but I have the imprsion he was in the Pusson march. My family all most missed this war but my wife went to Afganistan and Iraq, She wasnt in the field but its not cool when there shooting morters at your wife. And I have fired a real MP40, MG42, K98, BAR,Tommy gun,Garnd M1, Flame thrower (water charged) Morter,and a chit load of other us weapons. Ridden in an Opel, jeep, that 252 half track thing, and a BMW motorcycle with side car and machine gun mount, and a chit load of US vehicles. And I was in the U.S. Army as infantry first and Artillery once I found out you got a ride everywhere you went. My dad use to take me to those armed show's where they try to sell stuff to other countries. Got to see some cool stuff shoot.

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My great grandfather “SULSER, Frederick Franklin GM3c USN Ohio” died aboard the USS Arizona during the attack on purl harbor when it was hit by a Japanese 800 kg bomb. He is among the battleship's 1,177 crew members who lost their lives on December 7, 1941.

You can find his name in the list on the link below.

http://www.nps.gov/archive/usar/AZCas.html

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Well I'll jump on the band wagon:

Grandfather (b 1907) was 4F - didn't serve in the military. He was an electrical engineer and worked for the Army Signal Corps developing and refining radar for both land based deployment and planes. His units (radar) were deployed to Hawaii and one was in use on December 11, 1941. He always said that the soldiers weren't being properly trained and constantly complained about it.

Great Uncle Cy - Served the entire war on merchant ships in the North Atlantic. He signed abouard a freighter in 1937 at the age of 15. He had two ships torpedoed and one bombed during the war. He continued in the merchant marine business until he retired in 1990.

Wife's grandfather - Was on the first wave of landings at Omaha beach with the A/116th Infantry Regiment of the 29th Infantry Division. He landed at Dog Green and was, in his words "One of the luckiest SOBs on that beach. I was neck deep in the water and made it all the way to the beach, and then the seawall and never got shot." He cleaerd obstacles and pulled wounded men up to the seawall where they were pinned down all day by snipers and MG fire. He didn't get a single scratch from enemy action (he was cut up and bruised from all the scrambling around). During the battle for Brest a Bf-109G-6/R2 dropped a bomb which landed directly on an ammo truck near him. He said the blast threw him about 30-40 feet. It ruptured his right eardrum and destroyed the cochlea which causes him vertigo to this day. He was sent back to England for recovery and spent 1945-49 in Germany with the Army. Only in the last 3 years has he started talking about his experiences.

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