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      Attention Soldiers Operation Fury Needs you!   02/20/2020

      Attention All Soldiers, Operation Fury needs you.  You need to choose a side and sign up.  
      For more intel on Operation Fury Please click HERE Please go to Special Event Forum (here), And sign up for allied or axis.
      This will be a CRS Lead event on both sides.  Xoom will be heading up the axis side and Heavy265 will be heading up the Allied side. This will be for bragging rights.
      Why are we asking players to sign up you ask. We are trying for a role play experience.   We want this to be a true realistic event.  
      So get up and sign up and let's make this the best event ever!!!!!!!!!!
      Give me your war cry, grrrrrrrrrrrrr
      Heavy265 **out**
raygunn

World War 2 Veterans

275 posts in this topic

My father was born in Warsaw in 1928. He lived under German occupation and witnessed several 'atrocities'. He escaped Poland before he was due to get shipped out to a labour camp and eventually made it to the middle east where he joined the British Army at age 14. He lied about his age of course although that also meant he got his pension 2 years early in the UK! He was an artillieryman and served in Italy and was captured on the East coast and spent Oct 1944 to the end of the war in various POW camps (not very nice) until he was 'libbed' by the Russians who did sod all to provide them with anything. He made his way to the American lines where he was fed, showered, given fresh clothes and even a comfortable bunk in an American HQ before being sent on his way to the British forces.

He still does not like to talk about it and has said he prefers to 'lock it all away and forget'.

He is still alive and kicking.

Dandare9

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All my family knows about my grandfather was that he was a cook in the army, served in the Pacific, was at the Phillipines, he hated dug out Doug, he had malaria and spent alot of his time on board ship in the med bay.

Current thinking is he was in the death march, since he died nobody has bothered to get his records to see what happened to him and when.When he was alive he wouldnt say 2 words about what happened to him other than the fact he hated Dug out Doug.

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Well here are the relatives I know about:

Obviously you all know everything about General George S. Patton, my cousin.

Then theres Frank Hamilton, my Great Grandfather. He was a cook on a destroyer in the Mediterranean, apparantly they captured a German U-Boat. Another relative, who had been in command of the 1st South African Infantry Brigade in World War One, was also in Command of the South African Quartermaster Corps, a man by the name of Lieutenant General Mitchel Baker. There were others, but I'm not sure about them.

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My Grandfather, John Boow, was in the 1st Airborne Division, The Border Regiment and took part in the Invasion of Sicily and then later Operation Market Garden during the defence of the Oosterbeek Perimeter, until they escaped across the Rhine, then at the end of the War he was in Norway for the German Surrender.

PicSupply3.jpg

He's the one 3rd from the Right. :D

My Grandmother made parts for Bombers.

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My father was born in 1945 just as the war ended, but my Grandfather was in the French army, I forget which unit, but he was in active duty when the germans came over the border. I believe he was injured in an accident with his horse before the germans showed up. (He was mounted infantry) and as the germans occupied northern france, he helped out the resistance by smuggling tires and potatoes. (items the germans killed french citizens for hoarding.) My Grandmother told me that the only thing the germans would allow them to keep to eat were turnips.

My Grandparents neighbor's owned a windmill and were forced to make bread for the german soldiers throughout the war, but he would scrape the flour that ended up on the walls and floor, and make bread out of them and give them to my grandparents because they had I think 3 children at the time.

So, my grandparents had to eat turnips, and nasty bread throughout the war.

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My grandfather and grandmother on my mothers side were both in the army. My grandfather was stationed in the Philippines, and served as both an infantryman and cook. My grandmother was an Army combat nurse in the Army Nurse Corps and was stationed near Africa.

My grandfather on my fathers side was in the Marines and was captured by the Japanese at Bataan. He spent most of his war time in a POW camp and was in fact in the Bataan Death March. He is still alive to this day, though he refuses to talk to anyone about his experiences during the war.

I have a few other relatives that served, but I unfortunately know very little about the things they experienced overseas. My step-grandfather was an engineer in the Air Force, and my great-uncle was in the Navy aboard one of the aircraft carriers in the Pacific, either the Altamaha or the Enterprise.

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My first post so be kind :)

A greatuncle was a 17 year old replacement to France in August, 1944. Shot in the calf on his first patrol and spent the rest of the war in the hospital.

Another great uncle was one of the drivers for Eisenhower in North Africa. Drove for others on the general staff for the remainder of the war.

My step-dad is a Korean and Vietnam Navy veteran (purple heart from VN).

I'm also a Navy Vietnam veteran, but the scariest era in my career was in the Persian Gulf when the Iranis took over our embassy. My ship was buzzed every 15 minutes by Irani planes (that we had sold them naturally).

My primary thought was " How does a blond, blue-eyed American make it outta here if they sink this ship.... "

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Grandad on Da's side was in Guadacanal as an infantryman, and later served as a "Scout" in the Pacific campaigns.

Great Uncle was a landing craft driver, and claims to have his boat in the famous MacArthur returning picture at Leyte. Dunno- probably bull crap.

My Dad is even more interesting- joined Air Force in 1950, learned Russian, flew as airborne signal intercept. He is the recipient of a DFC, Meritorious Service x2, and Air Medal x5 (to name a few). He doesn't talk about any of them, but just a few weeks ago we put the medals in a medal case with US flag and he cried. What a pussy.

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My grandfather, whom I still have, and has been happily married to my grandmother for 66 years, was rejected by the Candian army twice with a hernia.

My grandmother agreed to marry him, on the condition he didnt join the military. Since he was rejected already twice, there seemed no fear in going overseas.

Soon after they married, the military came a calling, and in the words of my grandfater.." they felt my forehead to see if I was warm, and designated me..good to go"

After 6 weeks of basic training, he was held back from his group as they went overseas, as he was witness to the death of a underage soldier from a discharged blank during basic training operations.

He left Halifax in a cold wet snow on the "Ilse de France" after a forbidden phone call to my grandmother to tell her he was shipping out the next day for Scotland.

Reports of Uboats off the eastern coast had the Isle de France head so far south as to avoid the uboats, my grandfather said... " We were all out on deck in short sleaves"

The round about way to the Britain had put the ship almost a full week behind schedule.

No one was more surprised to see them dock in Scotland than the scots that received them.

The Germans, using false reports for propaganda purposes had reported their Uboats had sank the Isle du France not more than a day out of halifax port.

my grandfather could only think of his last phone call to his wife telling her the ship he had departed on. It weighed heavy on him for another week before he could get another call into my grandmother. As fortune would have it, the false news had never reached my grandmothers ears, and "papa" played it cool.

His logistics carree, driving trucks around England was cut short when he was "volunteered" for the infintry. 3 short weeks of training and he was on the front lines in Belgium and holland, until the end of the war. Wounded twice by shrapnel, I have the small peice removed from his hand in a test tube.

To this very day my 91 y/o grandfather still drives, and works his garden, active in the legion and other senior groups. his sense of humour and all faculties are very much intact. The greatest generation ever, and forever my personal hero

Ken Herbert Clark

Kidd27

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My great grand dad was at Pegasus Bridge. He helped a german officers friend who had is leg blow off in there first assault after there landing.

He was a very proud man and he said he would never forget that day as it was the only day in his life which he true had lived, his words.he was in the 6th Airborne and dropped on the 5th June,1944.

For any one who dosnt nowhat it was i nicked this from wiki.

On the night of 5/6 June 1944, a force of 181 men, led by Major John Howard, landed in six Horsa gliders to capture Pegasus Bridge, and also "Horsa Bridge", a few hundred yards to the east, over the Orne River. The force included elements of B and D Companies, 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, a platoon of B Company, Royal Engineers, and men of the Glider Pilot Regiment. This object of this action was to prevent German armour from crossing the bridges and attacking the eastern flank of the landings at Sword Beach.

Five of the Ox and Bucks's gliders landed 40 yards from their objectives at 16 minutes past midnight. The attackers poured out of their battered gliders, completely surprising the German defenders, and took the bridges within 10 minutes. They lost two men in the process, Lieutenant Denholm Brotheridge and Lance-Corporal Fred Greenhalgh.

Lieutenant Brotheridge thus became the first member of the invading Allied armies to die in combat on D-Day.

One glider, assigned to the capture of Horsa Bridge, landed at the bridge over the River Dives, some 7 miles off. Most of the soldiers in this glider moved through German lines towards the village of Ranville where they eventually rejoined the British forces. The Ox & Bucks were reinforced half-an-hour after the landings by 7th Battalion, The Parachute Regiment and linked up with the beach landing forces with the arrival of Lord Lovat's Commandos.[1]

My grand siad it took them 20 mins to secure the bridge and that a hand full of french tank refitted by the germans rolled on them before retreating after his mate knocked one of them out by a direct hit with a nat ATG.

My granddad actual took a round in the arm which passed right through.

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My Great Grand-Dad was Irish,

He shot a butt load of english "black &tans" then went to the USA!

YAY!!!!!!!!!!!

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My Great Grand-Dad was Irish,

He shot a butt load of english "black &tans" then went to the USA!

YAY!!!!!!!!!!!

Black and Tans were Irish loyalists auxilairy police recruited in England mainly from ww1 vets. They fought a bloody COIN cmapaign during the Irish war of independence in the early 1920s.

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My Great-Grandfather was in British Army WW1 , dont have any details about him thou.

My Grandfather was in the British Army in the Far East , i have details of his unit somewhere " will have to do some searching throu old stuff" he was a sargent . He as captured by the Japs and spent 3 years in POW camps , luckily , because he was healthy " or as healthy as one could be " he missed the burma railway and was taken to the Tin mines in north japan .

After he was released , he came back to the UK by a long train journey accross Alaska and Canada , then by Boat.

Right up until they day he died a few years ago , he considered himself to be a very lucky man , he spent many years writing to old friends and even some of the Japanese Guards from various camps.

I do have some old stories which i will think about typing up , also have WW1 medals "great grandfather " and WW2 medals "Grandfather" , will have to collect them from my Mother , although i inherited them , she has kepted them for now.

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Grandfather on moms side was rejected for service in WW2 due to a weak heart.

Grandfather on dads side was selected to fly lancaster bombers with the RCAF in 1943..eventually trained as a co-pilot when a shortage of enginners meant he retrained as an engineers...in time for a shortage of radio operators which he completed in time to fly into england in 1945. No active combat operations.

Grandmother's sisters husband was a dispatch rider in the British Army...only one to survive out of the group of 13 that enlisted in 1939. Mostly due vehicle colisions during convoy moves in England.

Another of Mom's uncles served with the American Army in WW1 and WW2 but don't know much about his service.

Uncle did 30 years with the RCAF SARTEC's in western Canada. Lost quite a few friends due to bad jumps/aircraft crashes but has some great training stories he's shared.

Two distant cousins currently in Iraq with the US forces.

Mom's family came to Canada in 1665 due to the French Carignan-Salieres Regiment being shipped to Quebec City as many had malaria due to service in Turkey and New France was the coldest, non-malaria climate available. Married one of the King's orphans shipped out several years later and the rest is history...

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Not family but a story I always feel needs to be shared. 5 years ago at Remembrance Day one of the gentleman from church stood up and started talking...it was a story so painfull he could barely stand up to speak but he felt he had to share it before he passed.

Ben had signed up with the RAF in the early 1940's and proceeded to complete a tour of operations in North Africa which he considered boring duty at the time so asked to get posted back to England. On their 13th mission they were on a Mk.III Halifax bomber, callsign G for Geoge, when in his words..something hit them...flak/nightfighter...still doesn't know but the order came to bail out.

Ben jumped, saw the second fellow come out, third jumped out but his chute streamed on him and he fell to his death...at which point the bomber exploded killing the rest of the crew above him...9 of his closest friends dead.

When he landed he was surounded by a crowd of angry germans civilians who had a pitchfork at his throat and the mobs as starting to get violent when two german policemen showed up and with drawn pistols pulled him from the mob and locked him into the town jail for "his on safety".

After a brief interogation he was informed that his other surviving crew member had been killed by a mob when he landed and that he was the sole survivor. A few days later he was shipped to a POW camp on an infamous 40 men or 8 horses boxcar...except when they stopped at the one town which had been bombed several days before they were allowed to get some exercise walking around the train and be fed. When the townsfolk saw the uniforms a mob started towards but were held back by a couple of Luftwaffe members passing through town long enough to let the train guards convinced the POW's to get back on the train where they locked them into the boxcar. The mob pounded on the car and were rocking it back and forth but thanks to the chain locking them in they were unharmed.

Remainder of the war was spent in a POW camp until liberated. It was in the POW camp he found god and spent the next 50 odd years working as a priest as a means to give back thanks. Ben still conducts the odd service but his health isn't very good anymore and has never spoken again about the experience.

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My great-grandfather was a tommy in WWI . He was proclaimed MIA in the first few days of the Somme offensive.

My grandfather (on my mothers side) flew mosquitoes in WWII, his job as to fly ahead of the main bombers and mark the targets. He managed to survive the war but passed away of cancer a few years after.

My grandfather (on my fathers side) was stationed in Burma, he doesn't really like to talk about what happened there, so I don't ask.

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Here is a link you can check out of my Grandfather who served in the Marines in South Pacific. ( http://marines.togetherweserved.com/profile/237311 ) He was in the same Company as the 1st Marine MOH winner of WW2 Sgt "Manila John" Basilone " they were both were wounded at Guadalcanal's Henderson Airfield Japanesse counter attack .My Grandfather was a Rifleman in the 1st Bat / 7th Marine Reg , 1st Marine Division. I knew him just as my "Grandpa" until he got older then he started to open up somewhat about his experiences. He gave me a copy of the Guadacanal Diary and "The Old Breed" and told me to read them if I wanted to find out what he and his fellow Marines did over there . He passed away in 2000 , It was only then did I find his diaries,medals and notes about what he and the other Marines did and several accomadations & citations for his service at Guadalcanal, New Guinea and other campaigns. Needless to say I am very pround of him and wish he was still around today . He was a good man always a "salty marine with just a hint of a dark side" . He was what I tried to model myself about. Its a long story but he joined with 2 Cousins ,an older Brother and a Brother-In-Law. all wanted to help and pick where they went rather than wait on the draft. All but 1 came home (KIA Henry Sweetin Franklin County , Illinois, US Army 1944 Phillipines ).

here is the link, fellow Marines please feel free to join ,

http://marines.togetherweserved.com/profile/237311

Regards

Bullit51 , Matt Lampley

http://marines.togetherweserved.com/profile/237311

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I have some items from my late Lustwaffe FlaK groundpersonel grandfather which I would like to know more about. Perhaps some buff here knows or knows where to ask:

At first I thought I had received a generic, from my grandfather´s service, K98k Mauser Bayonete with frog of which I have already a few. At first the Khaki-Green paint of the scarbard I found odd and given its wodden grips and not blued blade for a Luftwaffe issue. I thought it might have been a RAD bayonete or even my grand grand father´s WWI issue. But then the ZBr4markings and trusty google gave me this:

http://www.old-smithy.info/bayonets/fullsize/poland/poland%20WZ22%20zbr4%20general%202.jpg

http://www.old-smithy.info/bayonets/Polish%20Mausers.htm

Apparently I had come upon a war souvenir my grandfather toke in Poland where he fought in 1939 and toke home on some early war leave.

Most engigmatic I have what looks like some sort of flight compass that my grandfather told me he toke from one of his battery´s shot down brit bomber In Belgium.

Fourteen instruments of note

were found, including a compass that

appeared to be of simple 1930s style until it

was realised it had no degree scales and was

marked ‘Bombsight D.’ Enquiries on the RIN

Forum and to the RAF Museum reached the

same conclusion. The Wimperis Course

Setting Bombsight (CSBS) used in WW2

contained within its main body a compass –

all the sight required was a clear magnetic

north indication by the needle. This led to a

supplementary question. Tangmere had a

WW2 CSBS Mk IX bombsight as used on the

Lancaster and Mosquito

Page 28

http://www.rin.org.uk/files/janfeb07.pdf

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pkhluk/298758213/

Like this one but in much better shape.

Next item:

http://www.wwiidaggers.com/27816.htm

luftwaffe_type_II_b.jpg

My Grandfather´s German Dog Tag which reads:

269 W

2./Flakscheinw. Abt. 129

Which leads to:

http://ww2.dk/ground/flak/flargt129.html

http://ww2.dk/ground/flak/6lvkdo.html

Then acording to the award document (bellow) he gets transfered to 11./Flakregiment 4 (mot.) that gets stationed in the west and becomes:

http://ww2.dk/ground/flak/abt/sw469.html

and finally

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruhr_Pocket

Next item:

luftwaffeflakbadgefrtsm.jpg

http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/war_badges/luftwaffe/Flak_badge1.htm

The Award document

http://www.germanwarbooty.com/y-4063%20041.JPG

Similar to this one, it starts "Verleihungsurkunde

Im Namen des Oberbefehlshabers der Lustwaffe

verleie Ich dem Unteroffizier XXXXXX 11./Flakregiment 4 (mot.)

das Flakampfabzeichen

Gefechtstand, den 18. Februar 1943.

Der Komandeur der 16. Flakdivision

*A signature* Generalleutnant

and a stamp that shows the army eagle and 16. Flakdivision and what looks like a "two" at the bottom.

A bit of research shows that for that time it must have been "GenLt Kurt Steudemann" who commanded and thus signed between 15.6.42 - 28.2.43

http://www.geocities.com/~orion47/WEHRMACHT/LUFTWAFFE/Generalleutnant/STEUDEMANN_KURT.html

Next item is a folder that are my grandfather class notes while he was attending his Unteroffizier course and which he must have dropped home on leave after finishing the course. The binder is quite big and the man must have done quite some writting. The only problem here is the writting style. Its old german and is a nightmare to deszipher (sample)

Write your name in

Suetterling

http://www.suetterlinschrift.de/Englisch/Write_your_name.htm

Next item:

Another folder that reads "FlugzeugerKennungsdienst!"

This one is filled with taped little cut outs of all kind of various allied and Axis plane models. It seems my Grandfather just cut them out from various magazines on his own. There are soviet, A beautiful document about the Short Stirling with "weakspots" to aim for. Pages about the weird BV141 or FW 187. Another page about a Churchill III tank, veritable pages and pages of ww2 german magazine cut outs. He told me he wanted to become a pilot at the end of the war but it was to late and the flight school unit disolved and he was returned for ground combat in the Ruhr.

Next item:

74749.jpg74749_1.jpg

http://de.metapedia.org/wiki/Der_Staat_der_Arbeit_und_des_Friedens

http://www.internet-shop-pfalz.de/antiquitaeten/milit-r-kriege/der-staat-der-arbeit-und-des-friedens-1934.htm

I wish I had a scanner of some sort to post and show you the very nice WW2 collection of photos my grandfather made while 1939-45.

My WoW playing cousin got himself the first pick and kept a SS Honor Dagger though :(

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Mother side:

Gandad was a mg man in winterwar and continuation war. never met him but granny told that he sometimes talked about how crazy it was.. russians running on field wave after a wave when they could have just attack trough forests. She said that grandad never knew how much he killed just "a lot"

He was wounded by schrapnels.

Granny was keeping the farm during continuation war near frontlines suomussalmi when there came few other women to say that russian desant had landed near the farm. women took some hunting rifles and hunted the poor spy down.

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My Great-Grandfather was a General at Anzio, on the allied side. He, (I don't know if this is before or after anzio) got bits of shrapnel from a bomb lodged inside him, yet didn't die. So whenever he would pass through a metal detector, he would always set it off. My Grandfather was in charge of an air squadron, and my other grandfather was a Quatermaster for the US Navy. While we're on the subject of ancestors, my ancestor signed the Declaration of Independance.

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My Great Grand-Dad was Irish,

He shot a butt load of english "black &tans" then went to the USA!

YAY!!!!!!!!!!!

They were not english but thanks for trying to squeeze in some political agenda to a non political forum!

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I don't have alot of details, I'm going on some wild free info from Ancestry.com, but apparently I had a great uncle who was a panzer commander in Normandy.

Don't know much else.

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