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      Attention Soldiers Operation Fury Needs you!   02/20/2020

      Attention All Soldiers, Operation Fury needs you.  You need to choose a side and sign up.  
      For more intel on Operation Fury Please click HERE Please go to Special Event Forum (here), And sign up for allied or axis.
      This will be a CRS Lead event on both sides.  Xoom will be heading up the axis side and Heavy265 will be heading up the Allied side. This will be for bragging rights.
      Why are we asking players to sign up you ask. We are trying for a role play experience.   We want this to be a true realistic event.  
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      Heavy265 **out**
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propa

WWIIOL Starter ACC Propaganda

19 posts in this topic

Do starter account access items remain playable after the subscription has expired?

Any plans for a USA browning mg class?

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Do starter account access items remain playable after the subscription has expired?

Any plans for a USA browning mg class?

You must maintain an active starter subscription, it is not a 1 time buy. However, if you decide to go back to free play, you can downgrade.

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499P%20lwBF109e4.jpg

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4

History

Deployed in quantity during the spring of 1940, the Bf 109E-4 variant was a significant upgrade over the original Emils. The original DB 601A-1 powerplant was replaced by the more powerful DB 601Aa, and firepower was vastly improved in weight of fire and destructive potential as each wing now packed one 20 mm MG-FF/M cannon.

Game Play

The Bf 109E-4 variant is fast and carries the heaviest armament of the Bf 109 series until the later G variant is introduced, with two 20mm cannon in the wings. However, with but 60 rounds per gun it pays to get close and only fire when certain to score a hit. Light and nimble and possessing of excellent dive characteristics, the Bf 109E-4 can mix it up in circling combats as well as stick to fast diving attacks. The Emil can be effective against any enemy type using coordinated wingman tactics, but when fighting without such support the pilot must rely on its speed and climb rate to survive an encounter against bad odds. Combine its overall good performance with a cool headed and confident pilot and the E can hold its own through an entire campaign. In the early stages of a WWIOL:BE campaign the Bf 109E does well to avoid typical protracted dogfights as all Allied aircraft can out turn the Bf 109E-4 with relative ease. Climbing, spiralling turns with but a small initial energy advantage, followed by slashing high-speed attacks, is the Bf

109E's forte. As the campaign progresses the Bf 109E-4 loses its speed advantage but gains in turn radius, requiring (and allowing) the pilot to rethink his approach to air combat.

While it is difficult for many players to grasp the advantages of a climbing turn style of combat, where the ability to bleed your opponent's energy to the point of stall while you remain above them awaiting the moment to drop on their head like a sledge hammer, it remains one of the most effective forms of air superiority combat tactics you can learn and master.

Another tactic that works well in the 109E is the scissors style where a series of slicing reversals one after another will force a pursuing fighter with a better turn rate (but less roll rate) out in front of your guns. Again, this is a difficult style of combat to learn but extremely effective if you ever do manage to learn how to master such a method.

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499P%20BritSpitMK1.jpg

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IA

History

The Spitfire is probably the most famous fighter aircraft of all time, and arguably one of the most beautiful, with its unmistakable elliptical wings and sleek lines. The Spitfire was based on the Rolls Royce Goshawk-powered Supermarine Type 224, Vickers Supermarine designer Reginald "R.J." Mitchell’s ugly gull-winged entry into the 1934 British Air Ministry Specification F7/30 fighter competition. The 224 was a disappointment, but Mitchell persevered with development.

Mitchell decided to fit the new Rolls Royce PV12 engine (soon to be renamed the Merlin) and refined the design, introducing retractable landing gear and the familiar elliptical wings, which, ironically, was inspired by the German Heinkel He-70. The new Type 300 showed such promise that the Air Ministry drew up a specification for it (F37/34) and funded the prototype. The all-metal Type 300 was a stressed-skin, low-wing monoplane with a tail skid and a fixed-pitch, two-blade wooden propeller, and space for an unheard of 8 machine guns! Soon after its first flight, Mar. 5, 1936, the Air Ministry ordered 310 Spitfires. Mitchell, ill with cancer since 1933, died June 1937.

Vickers Supermarine immediately ran into problems. The small subsidiary only had experience building small quantities of flying boats and a few racing seaplanes - “Supermarine”, the opposite of “submarine”, means flying boat. Other companies signed on to build parts of the aircraft (around 80% of the construction), but the technology to build this advanced fighter was just too much for the unskilled labor that was available. Nine months after construction began, only a few pairs of wings and fuselages were complete and the Spitfire order was very nearly canceled. Furthermore, the eight machine guns froze at high altitudes. It took over a year to develop effective gun heating.

But the production problems were sorted out, and the first production Spitfire Mk I flew May 1938. It differed from the prototype in that it had a tail wheel, a stiffer wing, a bigger fuel tank, and increased flap travel.

By 1939, about 50 Spitfires had been delivered; the first squadron to equip was 19 Squadron at Duxford. The first Mk I Spitfires employed the Merlin II engine driving a two-blade, fixed-pitch propeller, and only four of the eight planned .303cal (7.7mm) Browning machine guns due to a shortage. Supermarine introduced improvements during production: the bulged canopy (starting with aircraft number eight); a two-position, three-bladed propeller (no. 74); and the Merlin III engine with a Rotol or de Havilland three-bladed, constant-speed propeller (no. 194). Armor protection improved in stages.

When Britain declared war on Germany and sent forces to France, it considered the Spitfire too valuable to risk and retained the planes in Britain. Spitfires started flying sorties from southern England May 12, and were committed in large numbers as the fighting moved closer to the English Channel. Spitfires shot down about 260 aircraft during the Dunkirk evacuation at a cost of 72 losses.

The Mk IB introduced two wing-mounted Hispano 20mm cannon, each fed by a 60-round drum. Initially, wing flexing often jammed the cannons and four Browning machine guns were later added as a supplement. Only a few Mk IBs were built. The machine-gun-armed Spitfire was retroactively renamed the Mk IA.

The Spitfire offered performance similar to that of the superb Bf 109E, almost exactly equal to the Bf109E series below 15,000 ft (4,500 m), and slightly slower above. The 109 outclimbed the Spitfire, but the Spitfire held the edge in a turning fight. The 109 and its fuel-injected engine could perform negative-G nose-overs that the Spitfire could not follow because its carburetor-aspirated Merlin cut out during negative-G manoeuvres. The early Spitfire suffered somewhat from the low caliber of its weapons.

These weak spots were all that held back early versions of the Spitfire, but as it gained power and bigger guns, it truly fulfilled its design goals in staying fast, climbing quickly, turning tightly, and finally bringing decent firepower to bear on its opponents. It was the dogfighter's dream, not just in the beginning of the war but throughout.

Game Play

The Spitfire starts as the premier fighter aircraft for the Allied forces in the early days of a Battleground Europe campaign, and stays one throughout as it develops from the nimble but lightly armed Mk I through later versions like the Mk V and the Mk IX, both with 20mm cannons, more ammunition, and more powerful engines.

In the early days of a campaign, while the Bf 109E can out climb a Spitfire in a vertical drag race, the Spit has a noticeable turn rate advantage. The Spitfire Mk I does have a problem with aileron reversal at high speeds in dives, and good 109 pilots will force this upon you if they get into trouble. Negative G forces also evoke carburetor fuel starvation so be careful when pushing forward on the stick.

You can decrease the effects of this if you learn to use your rudder when diving after an enemy 109 trying to get away, and as long as you remember that rolling left stick will cause you to roll right (and vice versa) until you slow down some, you should be OK. If nothing else it will teach you to be a more intuitive pilot although it might be frustrating at first.

Remember to save your ammunition as you don’t have a lot of it, and work to get in very close before firing as the light machine guns of both the early Spitfire and Hurricane fighters do not work well at long range. Hits at longer ranges will only waste ammunition for little or no reward. Aces in these planes can get multiple kill sorties but only because they hold their fire until they are almost eating the rudders of their opponents and they set their gun convergence short, where it will multiply the effects of the guns close to their targets.

Set convergence of your guns with “.conv “ when in the game.

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