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Help "Doc" fight lymphoma

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GrAnit

Best of luck Doc! 

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jwilly

Tough it out Geoff. We're with you.

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jet2019

Best of luck mate..I have friends who have gone through it and are still missing their drinks round at the pub years later );

Give your friends and loved ones a hug!

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bersi

good luck doc and best wishes

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kr0nik

God bless you DOC              PS you will NEVER be an EX RAT to me     YOU ARE "THE" RAT

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Jsilec

Good luck doc

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jam

I hope you win the battle, Geoff,

Determination counts for quite a lot.

My next younger brother has been fighting stage 4 cancer for about 8 months and so far, he appears to have achieved a state of remission.

The rate at which developments are occurring in the cancer-fighting field provides some reason to hope.

Cheers,

~ Joe

 

 

Edited by jam

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DOC

I like the fact that there are some blunt sarcastic individuals working with me in this fight.

"To be honest ... in order to cure you we're going to be as close as we can get to killing you."

At least I get to join Keith Richards in the whole "complete blood transfusion" stakes. Only required of course because they have to kill my blood. They're giving me artificial leukemia !  :rolleyes:

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dog3

Good luck, Doc! A lot of us that don't post often will still be thinking of you. Push on through to the other side...

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DOC

Time to fill you in on the latest. It's been awhile but really ... apart from "this sucks like nothing on earth" there wasn't a lot to say. To be honest ... even though this is the worst thing I have ever experienced I know vets suffer hundreds of times worse so I don't ever want to be complaining about it. To this great community here at WWIIOL ... I wouldn't have made it this far without your brilliant help, so I am beholding to you forever now. There will never be words enough to thank you for that. Maybe just shoot me instead. ;)

:UPDATE:

I've now entered phase 3 of the program ... which doesn't mark much change really other than it's a cumulative process. They changed some of my medication after phase 1 proved almost unendurably bad with respect to how my body responded (violently) to the chemicals and the radiation. This improved how my body is reacting but being cumulative it still managed to get a little worse. So I'm really feeling weak because it's a constant state of fatigue balanced with trying to hold onto my weight while being unable to eat real solid food. My throat has shut down to the point where I'm on scientific nutrition formula. Baby food for astronauts baby ! Yeah ! Houston we don't have no problem. My larynx gave up a few days ago and I can't speak while undergoing radiation, so I'm totally modern now and a texter like the rest of the world. GOOD NEWS ! The tumor in my lymphatic system has responded well and appears to be going away. We won't know the precise progress until testing and biopsies are done after phase 3 is over with and complete. It does however on appearances look much better though. So that's fantastic. The throat tumor is also apparently (visually) responding well but again, no testing/biopsies until after this next phase is complete. That means about 2 months time until we can begin testing again. Until then ... chemo radiation daily. UGH. The chemo will be wound down first and frankly I can't wait, it's easily the most debilitating experience I have ever encountered. It destroys everything. Good and bad. Oh there's some cancer DESTROY ! Oh look, there's some white blood cells. DESTROY !! Hey guys, we found some healthy tissue here. DESTROY !!! I'm going to bet the radiation isn't much better ... combined this is truly soul crushing but I'm hanging in there though as we enter the back straight. During all this time, I'm an old man with the energy of a cadaver. If my house doesn't fall apart around me while I'm holding on by my fingernails (which have stopped growing, pretty neat eh !) I'll be looking pretty good. A little over cooked (radiation burn, the best kind of sunburn) and missing some hair here and there ... but looking good. So yeah ... some of the process has become easier and some of it ... err ... no not so much. Not sure if the roundabouts are winning or if the swings are about to nail me in the head. It does look like I might actually win this and I'm positive in that respect. I never would have got this far without the help of those who came to my aid and I can never thank you enough. The war isn't over but the tide could turn in a few months ... but then again I don't want to get ahead of myself. Have a great Easter weekend and remember to take the time to enjoy something as simple as a bloody good hamburger. It could be your last. No offense to you vegans but I would kill for a bloody good hamburger right now. 

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Mosizlak

That's great news, Doc. 

Keep fighting. 

!S

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BMBM

Keep at it DOC, your six is clear.

S!

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sorella
35 minutes ago, DOC said:

The war isn't over but the tide could turn in a few months ... but then again I don't want to get ahead of myself. Have a great Easter weekend and remember to take the time to enjoy something as simple as a bloody good hamburger. It could be your last. No offense to you vegans but I would kill for a bloody good hamburger right now. 

You'll win the war Doc, just keep fighting. S! 

Also, not to be indelicate, but since you mentioned Easter: 6 years ago my hippie-dippy we are all the universe sister-in-law went through 9 months lymphoma treatments much as you describe including daily chemo and end-phase salvage chemo where they turn your own blood cells against you to kill the tumours. Got some but not all 6 thorax tumours left. They offered her another round and instead she asked me to take her to Lourdes - (you know, in France, south,  just off the WWIIOL map).  Worked. The doctors put it down to 'misreading scar tissues as tumours in the PET scans.  She put it down to something else and goes back every year on the anniversary to say thanks. true story.   

 

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jwilly

Where are you, metro DFW? Hmmm, long way away from me at the moment.

Quote

I would kill for a bloody good hamburger right now. 

Obviously your doctors and whoever else is managing your nutrition could overrule, but fundamentally "astronaut food" is made by finely grinding a food item into a puree...a soft paste or thick liquid.  Yuri Gagarin, all those years ago at the very beginning of the Russki cosmonaut program, ate pureed meat from a tube.

Of course, astronaut food has to be stable across a wide range of temperatures, and completely preserved. You however are on Earth, and stuff doesn't have to come to you by rocket or last for weeks or months before you eat it.

So it sure does seem possible to make a burger to your preferences...grill cooked, medium rare, ketchup and hot peppers, toasted sesame bun, whatever your specs would be...then puree the whole thing using a food processor, adding a few tablespoons of hot beef stock, and voila...food suitable for someone with dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) or other throat disabilities.

 

Edited by jwilly

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Elfin

Keep going DOC!

S!

 

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Merlin51

@jwilly
I do something kind of like that for this chilli i make.
The meat is simmered with several onions until the onions kind of cease to exits, and then because the meat needs to be extremely fine so that when finished
the whole thing flows with no chunks, i take a stick blender with chopper blades and puree the meat to death, before moving on to the next step.

Unfortunately, i wonder, even if pulverized to the finest of fine, if the meat would agree with his system well right now after swallowed? :( 

FUCKC54-BLACK-HPOST.jpg?1512811920
Keep at it DOC, eventually the war will end, and you can enjoy a hamburger and a beer on the field of victory.

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jwilly

Doc can further inform us if he wants, and chemo can be hard on food tolerance, but I'll bet his doctors are eager to get a protein/fat/carbs/fiber balanced diet and lots of calories into him if they can. Gotta eat well to get better--it takes a lot of nutrition to maintain and rebuild during chemo--plus you want to keep your GI system functioning for multiple reasons.

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DOC
3 hours ago, jwilly said:

Where are you, metro DFW? Hmmm, long way away from me at the moment.

Obviously your doctors and whoever else is managing your nutrition could overrule, but fundamentally "astronaut food" is made by finely grinding a food item into a puree...a soft paste or thick liquid.  Yuri Gagarin, all those years ago at the very beginning of the Russki cosmonaut program, ate pureed meat from a tube.

Of course, astronaut food has to be stable across a wide range of temperatures, and completely preserved. You however are on Earth, and stuff doesn't have to come to you by rocket or last for weeks or months before you eat it.

So it sure does seem possible to make a burger to your preferences...grill cooked, medium rare, ketchup and hot peppers, toasted sesame bun, whatever your specs would be...then puree the whole thing using a food processor, adding a few tablespoons of hot beef stock, and voila...food suitable for someone with dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) or other throat disabilities.

 

Yeah but I have no taste buds until 2 months after this treatment ends. everything tastes like poison. I'm going to miss food for some time to come. I'm getting the nutrition just no flavour. My food is pumped into me by tube anyway. Otherwise if it were just "difficulty" I'd have the world's best food processor and be grinding that [censored] into paste as we speak. What I miss right now is flavour. Anyone who hasn't realized it yet ... don't take flavour for granted. If you ever lose it, it will be a tragedy mark my words.

Oh and Jwilly ... yeah .... not losing weight is a battle. I have dropped 30 pounds (which I had to lose anyway) and that's while trying not to lose weight. Fighting chemo/radiation costs about the same in calories as just living a normal day, and all I do all day is eat and sleep. The GI tract is a different battle altogether. One medication closes it down, the other floods it out ... one does something else and the other something else again. I'm never going to hate the flu again, it's going to seem like a cloudy day on the beach after this.

Edited by DOC

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jwilly

I don't have much experience with marijuana, but it's discussed a lot in relation to chemo and appetite. Maybe that's other cancer types and treatments, though...?

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DOC

Medical marijuana just became legal in Texas and will be experimented with.

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jwilly

I once dated a woman who had experienced an odd closed head injury in an auto accident that damaged the sensory nerve bundle from the face to the brain. She was slowly recovering her impaired sense of taste, but more slowly for the tongue based sensing ability than for aroma sensing based in the nose. So, she tended to add extra salt, sugar and pepper to prepared foods to strengthen those aromatic flavor experiences. She also liked hot food because it has stronger aromas.

I gather than your tongue is impaired by your treatment. How about your nose?

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Merlin51
7 hours ago, DOC said:

Medical marijuana just became legal in Texas and will be experimented with.

This baffles me
It is perfectly legal to pump methotrexate or cytoxan or wellcovorin into someone, and charge them for the pleasure
but a stupid little plant that i dont think has ever been show to be really harmful in anyway aside from inhaling smoke (But that is ok as long as it is Winston/Salem?), is a no no.

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DOC
1 hour ago, Merlin51 said:

This baffles me
It is perfectly legal to pump methotrexate or cytoxan or wellcovorin into someone, and charge them for the pleasure
but a stupid little plant that i dont think has ever been show to be really harmful in anyway aside from inhaling smoke (But that is ok as long as it is Winston/Salem?), is a no no.

We live in what is, in many cases ... a very stupid world mate.

 

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aismov

S! Doc! Hang in there! Thinking about ya!!!

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Wingmann

It's not yet your time, you a$$hat.

Get well, FFS!

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