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Kilemall

Operation Unthinkable- The Very Real What If of WWII

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In the last year of his reign Hitler was counting on the Soviet and Anglo-American Allies to turn on each other. Patton's advocacy of such an action is of course legendary thanks to the movie if nothing else, but there is now evidence that Churchill was preparing to do exactly that.

Operation Unthinkable

http://www.history.neu.edu/PRO2/

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1. The assumption in the first study that the Russians and Japanese might form an alliance is historically questionable. The Far East Russians and the Japanese have perceived each other as the enemy for at least as long as a Siberia-incorporating Russia has existed. Historically, such long enmities have very rarely been overcome successfully when an alliance might otherwise have been made between two nations with a common current enemy.

2. Obviously these studies would have been vastly different with consideration of US use of nuclear weapons. The US could for instance have reached Moscow readily with B29s. It's generally considered that destruction of Moscow would have caused immense disruption to USSR's centralized economic management and political direction.

3. The US was well ahead of the USSR at the end of WWII in both their own development and in integration of German development of guided conventional bombs. The US and Great Britain also were well ahead of the USSR, primarily because of superior bombers, in development of earthquake bomb technology. These two technologies would have given the Allies a significant advantage in regard to their ability to destroy transportation route pinchpoints, such as bridges, tunnels, significant cuts and fills in mountainous areas, and other substantial civil engineering works with relatively long rebuilding times.

4. The USSR was significantly dependent on the Trans Siberian Railroad for transport of bulk raw materials, heavy manufactured products and seafood products from east to west...especially in the winter. This rail line, passing through innumerable civil engineered pinchpoints as it traversed the various Stans, would have been broadly open to structural attack using conventional ordnance by B29s based in India, where in fact a substantial B29 support infrastructure already existed as of 1944-45. It might also have been possible for B29 missions to target individual manufacturing and mining targets across the south central parts of the USSR. At the end of WWII, the USSR had no existing air defense capabilities across its vast southern frontier.

5. The US also could reach significant industrial and power-generation facilities across north central and eastern Siberia from existing B29-capable bases in Alaska. This might have enabled substantial long-term damage to USSR aluminum production capability.

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1. The assumption in the first study that the Russians and Japanese might form an alliance is historically questionable. The Far East Russians and the Japanese have perceived each other as the enemy for at least as long as a Siberia-incorporating Russia has existed. Historically' date=' such long enmities have very rarely been overcome successfully when an alliance might otherwise have been made between two nations with a common current enemy.[/quote']

OTOH, history is full of examples where two mortal enemies have formed allience for one reason or another. And when it happens, it always seems like "how was this possible?". Like Germany and Russia, long time mortal enemies stretching far beyond WW1. Many alliences USA made to fight communism are more than questionable as well... Yet it happened. And it will still happen, and is not as rare as we might (want to) think. IMHO.

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